The Prostatitis Foundation
 

Persistence of Chlamydia trachomatis Is Induced by Ciprofloxacin and Ofloxacin In Vitro

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
December 2000, p. 3288-3297, Vol. 44, No. 12

Ute Dreses-Werringloer1, Ingrid Padubrin1, Barbara Jurgens-Saathoff1, Alan P. Hudson2, H. Zeidler1, and L. Kohler1,
Department of Rheumatology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany1, and Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 492012

ABSTRACT

An in vitro cell culture model was used to investigate the long-term effect of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin on infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. Standard in vitro susceptibility testing clearly indicated successful suppression of chlamydial growth. To mimic better in vivo infection conditions, extended treatment with the drugs was started after infection in vitro had been well established. Incubation of such established chlamydial cultures with ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin not only failed to eradicate the organism from host cells, but rather induced a state of chlamydial persistence. This state was characterized by the presence of nonculturable, but fully viable, bacteria and the development of aberrant inclusions.

In addition chlamydia exhibited altered steady-state levels of key chlamydial antigens, with significantly reduced major outer membrane protein and near constant hsp60 levels. Resumption of overt chlamydial growth occurred after withdrawal of ciprofloxacin, confirming the viability of persisting chlamydia. In vitro ciprofloxacin results are consistent with clinical data, thereby providing an explanation for treatment failures of ciprofloxacin. Parallel in vitro studies with ofloxacin suggest a better correlation between clinical and laboratory-defined efficacy, although the clinical studies on which this assessment is based did not include monitoring of chlamydial persistence.

The data presented here clearly demonstrate that under at least some circumstances, standard determination of MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations for C. trachomatis allows no more than a simple definition of whether an antibiotic has some anti chlamydial activity; however, such testing is not always sufficient to verify that the antibiotic will eliminate the organism in vivo.

 

.........................................................................................
We're sorry you are having to learn about prostatitis, but we're glad you came here, because we think we can help. Please be advised that the Prostatitis Foundation does
not warrant, support, sponsor, endorse, recommend or accept responsibility for any health care provider or any treatment or protocol performed by any heath care provider.

© The Prostatitis Foundation
.........................................................................................

 
Add To Site Contact Home