The Prostatitis Foundation
 

Information from Various Sources

Research America Organization (February 17, 2016)

About Research America
We want to let all prostatitis patients and their families know about Research America. They are an organization that understands the value of research for all diseases and the crisis we have with chronic diseases that have no known cause or cure. Their website can be found at researchamerica.org There you will find their activities via weekly email alerts, blogs, monthly newsletters and policy updates. Their information can be a lot of help to us as we share many of their goals. Check out their webpage

We ask every patient or family member every year to write their senators, members of congress, and the National Institute of Health (NIH) to ask for research to find a cause and cure for prostatitis. We still prefer handwritten letters but email is acceptable. We will soon be providing addresses for people to contact. Tell them how much you have suffered and the consequences for your work and family.

Prostatitis Foundation

new program funding announcement (December 9, 2015)


Duggan, Emily (NIH/NIDDK) [E]
Dec 3 (4 days ago)
The National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is pleased to announce the release of a new program funding announcement for the Developmental Centers for Interdisciplinary Research in Benign Urology (P20): The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to seek applications for the Developmental Centers for Interdisciplinary Research in Benign Urology Program (P20). The intent of this Program is to build research teams composed of individuals with complementary expertise who propose to develop innovative resources or new research projects that utilize integrative approaches addressing research questions relevant to benign urological diseases. Application due date is February 22, 2016. Please be advised that, although not required, a letter of intent is strongly encouraged to be received by KUH by January 22, 2016. See below for URLs to the funding announcements:
The full funding opportunity announcement can be viewed at: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-16-012.html.
To request additional information, please contact Dr. Deborah Hoshizaki at dkhosh@nih.gov.

Data and Specimen Hub (October 2, 2015)

NICHD recently launched the NICHD Data and Specimen Hub (DASH), a centralized resource for researchers to store and access de-identified data from NICHD-funded research studies for secondary research use. NICHD DASH is a mechanism for NICHD investigators and grantees to share research data from studies in accordance with the NIH Data Sharing Policy and the NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy.

“For research to have the greatest possible impact on public health, data sharing is essential,” said NICHD Director Alan Guttmacher, M.D. “NICHD DASH should prove invaluable to us in accelerating scientific findings and maximizing the return on our research investments.”

Read the full Item of Interest at http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/Pages/083115-DASH.aspx

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Research America (September 18, 2015)

Research America
We want to let all patients and their families know about Research America. They are an organization that understands the value of research for all diseases and the crisis we have with chronic diseases that have no known cause or cure. Their website can be found at researchamerica.org There you will find their activities via weekly email alerts , blog, monthly newsletters and policy updates. Their information can be a lot of help to us as we share many of their goals.
We ask every patient or family member every year to write their senators, members of congress, and the National Institute of Health (NIH) to ask for research to find a cause and cure for prostatitis. We still prefer handwritten letters but email is acceptable. We will soon be providing addresses for people to contact. Tell them how much you have suffered and the consequences for your work and family.
Info@prostatitis.org

888-891-4200 discontinued (September 3, 2015)

discontinued 888-891-4200 discontinued
We have moved this column to a more relevant place so we can keep you informed of some recent decisions we have made. We have discontinued the toll free number above and the newsletter mailings. WE will start putting newsletters on an archive on the webpage and save the expense of the toll free phone number and mailing the newsletters. Our twentieth anniversary is October the 5th. When we started only twenty five percent of the people had internet access. That has reversed during the twenty years to where only twenty five percent do not have internet connections now. It should allow us more time to improve the website.
Our plans are to start work on redoing the website and updating the links. Please be patient as it will be a slow process.
These postings will continue from time to time so please check occasionally
Prostatitis Foundation
info@prostatitis.org

Call for new papers (September 15, 2012)

Introducing ‘‘African Journal of Applied Microbiology Research (AJAMR) ‘‘ Dear colleague, The African Journal of Applied Microbiology Research (AJAMR) is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal published monthly by Science Park Journals (http://scienceparkjournals.org/AJAMR). AJAMR is dedicated to increasing the depth of research across all areas of this subject. Call for Papers AJAMR welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the general criteria of significance and scientific excellence in this subject area, and will publish: • Original articles in basic and applied research • Case studies • Critical reviews, surveys, opinions, commentaries and essays We invite you to submit your manuscript(s) to microbiol@scienceparkjournals.org or microbio@yahoo.comfor publication. Our objective is to inform authors of the decision on their manuscript(s) within four weeks of submission. Following acceptance, a paper will normally be published in the next issue. Instruction for authors and other details are available on our website; http://scienceparkjournals.org/sri/instructions.htm AJAMR is an Open Access Journal One key request of researchers across the world is unrestricted access to research publications. Open access gives a worldwide audience larger than that of any subscription-based journal ad thus increases the visibility and impact of published work. It also enhances indexing, retrieval power and eliminates the need for permissions to reproduce and distribute content. AJAMR is fully committed to the Open Access Initiative and will provide free access to all articles as soon as they are published. Best regards, Dr. Robert Bright Acting Editor African Journal of Applied Microbiology Research (AJAMR) Email: microbiol@scienceparkjournals.org or microbio@yahoo.com Website: http://scienceparkjournals.org/AJAMR

"We will treat prostates like gall bladders, and removal for non cancers will be common." (September 10, 2012)

I am a physician who has been plagued with non-bacterial prostatitis for 6 years. The original 2 year course led to a Turp 5 years ago. My obstructive symptoms were greatly improved, and I remained pain free for 4 years. As the gland regrew the pain returned. The last year has been a gradual worsening despite short improvements with pelvic PT, quercetin, and any other voodoo that I threw at my gland. Lyrica has been a wonder drug as I sort out my likely eventual prostatectomy. This drug - 50 mg Bid has given me dramatic relief. I attempted to stop it on two occasions, with symptoms returning aggressively at about 36-48 hours, in keeping with the half life of the drug.
Some other thoughts. Most urologists treat this illness poorly. Few are objective. Antibiotics,NSAIDs, prosta-q etc. are rarely helpful with chronic prostatitis. Get a prostate MRI with contrast, and it will detail lesions and can diagnose prostatitis based on uptake. If the gland is the source, and pain is localized in the prostatic fossa, do not let someone label you as "chronic pelvic pain ". As robotic prostatectomy becomes more accepted, we will treat prostates like gall bladders, and removal for non cancers will be common.

NIH Therapeutic Discovery Pilot Program (July 10, 2012)

NIH Therapeutic Discovery Pilot Program

http://www.ncats.nih.gov/research/reengineering/rescue-repurpose/therapeutic-uses/funding.html

In May 2012, NIH launched the Therapeutics Discovery Pilot Program to match researchers with a selection of agents from industry to test ideas for new therapeutic uses. In Fiscal Year 2013, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) will provide up to $20 million for this program to fund two- to three-year staged, cooperative agreement research grants. If specific milestones are met, funded researchers will conduct pre-clinical validation and clinical feasibility studies in the first stage, and proof-of-concept clinical trials in the second stage. Some applications may request two-year support for proof-of-concept studies only. NIH has issued three related funding announcements. The announcements encourage U.S. investigators to submit short applications about how they would explore specific hypotheses about how an agent available through the pilot might be useful in a specific disease area.

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The Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) will provide a new network of medical research centers (July 9, 2012)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund is pleased to announce two new programs:

· The Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) will provide a new network of medical research centers focused on the discovery, diagnosis, and ultimately care of undiagnosed patients by capitalizing on recent advances in genomics and the infusion of basic researchers in clinical projects. More information about this program is available on the NIH Common Fund website at: http://commonfund.nih.gov/Diseases/index.aspx.

· The Common Fund's Extracellular RNA Communication program will explore new ways in which cells communicate with each other using extracellular ribonucleic acids (RNAs) — RNAs that are present in the space outside of and between cells. The program will provide foundational information about the synthesis, distribution, uptake, and function of extracellular RNAs that are involved in cell-to-cell communication that is critical for basic cell function and health. More information about this program is available on the NIH Common Fund website at: http://commonfund.nih.gov/exrna/index.aspx.

The NIH Common Fund supports goal-driven, research networks in which investigators generate data to solve technological problems, and/or otherwise pilot resources and tools that will be stimulatory to the broader research community. The research products of Common Fund programs are expected to catalyze disease-specific research supported by the NIH Institutes and Centers. Additional information about the NIH Common Fund can be found at http://commonfund.nih.gov.

The NIH encourages individuals and organizations to promote and disseminate this RFA information in related newsletters, publications, or on organizational websites.

Info about BPH and Continence (June 19, 2012)


The Prostatitis Foundation gets questions occasionally about prostate cancer and Beningn Prostatic Hyperplasia. (BPH) WE try to concentrate on prostatitis and refer those information requests to other agencies more qualified than we are to handle them. They have been advocating for those problems for a longer time than we have been in business and doing a good job which we do not wish to try to duplicate.
In light of that we want to call your attention to The National Association For Continence (NAFC) They have a couple consumer education brochures you might like to see.
One is titled: Enlarged Prostate or Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and the subtitle is What are The Treatment Options?
The other is entitled: What everyman should know, Including Instructions for Pelvic Muscle Exercises. They touch upon retention and Over Active Bladder (OAB)

You cannot know too much about these urinary tract related issues . To Order their pamphlets go to: http://www.nafc.org/online-store/consumer-leaflets-and-pamphlets/leaflets-for-men/enlarged-prostate-leaflet/ and http://www.nafc.org/online-store/consumer-leaflets-and-pamphlets/leaflets-for-men/incontinence-what-every-man-should-know/.

National Association for Continence
Po Box 1019
Charleston , SC 29402
www.nafc.org
1 800 252 3337

NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. (June 14, 2012)

On Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 12:02 PM, NICHD HDPress wrote:
NIH is the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. This research has had a major positive impact on nearly all of our lives by improving human health, fueling the U.S. economy, and creating jobs in our communities.

Due in large measure to NIH research, a baby born in the United States today can expect to live to nearly age 79—about three decades longer than one born in 1900. Not only are we living longer, but our quality of life is improving. Over the last quarter century, the proportion of older people with chronic disabilities has dropped by nearly one-third.

NIH also drives job creation and economic growth. NIH research funding directly supports hundreds of thousands of American jobs and serves as a foundation for the medical innovation sector, which employs 1 million U.S. citizens.

Read more at: http://www.nih.gov/about/impact/index.htm

Centers of Excellence in Symptom Science (March 29, 2012)



Centers of Excellence in Symptom Science
(P30)


Letter of Intent Due Date: April 16, 2012
Application Due Date(s): May 16, 2012
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): September 2012



The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) invites applications to establish Centers of Excellence for Symptom Science Research (P30).The purpose of the proposed grant program is to plan and develop the sustainability of and to enhance interdisciplinary, biobehavioral research for scientists conducting Symptom Science Research by enabling development of research infrastructure and centralized resources in support of research programs in these science areas:

(1) enhance research infrastructure by expanding and targeting research resources available to promote and support Symptom Science research;

(2) expand the number and quality of research projects aimed at improving (a) symptom management in persons of all ages with chronic and acute disorders, (b) the quality of life in persons with function-impairing symptoms and their caregivers, or (c) expand the number and quality of research projects aimed at improving health and quality of life in both healthy and chronically ill persons;

(3) expand the number of research investigators involved in interdisciplinary nursing science research;

(4) increase the quantity and quality of research projects utilizing, genetics/genomics, and biobehavioral methods;

(5) plan for and develop sustainability of research programs by building an active and growing research program with collaborations and partnerships both inside and outside of the applicant organization.

For more information please visit: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NR-12-006.html

Centers of Excellence in Symptom Science (March 29, 2012)



Centers of Excellence in Symptom Science
(P30)


Letter of Intent Due Date: April 16, 2012
Application Due Date(s): May 16, 2012
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): September 2012



The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) invites applications to establish Centers of Excellence for Symptom Science Research (P30).The purpose of the proposed grant program is to plan and develop the sustainability of and to enhance interdisciplinary, biobehavioral research for scientists conducting Symptom Science Research by enabling development of research infrastructure and centralized resources in support of research programs in these science areas:

(1) enhance research infrastructure by expanding and targeting research resources available to promote and support Symptom Science research;

(2) expand the number and quality of research projects aimed at improving (a) symptom management in persons of all ages with chronic and acute disorders, (b) the quality of life in persons with function-impairing symptoms and their caregivers, or (c) expand the number and quality of research projects aimed at improving health and quality of life in both healthy and chronically ill persons;

(3) expand the number of research investigators involved in interdisciplinary nursing science research;

(4) increase the quantity and quality of research projects utilizing, genetics/genomics, and biobehavioral methods;

(5) plan for and develop sustainability of research programs by building an active and growing research program with collaborations and partnerships both inside and outside of the applicant organization.

For more information please visit: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-NR-12-006.html

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research -- Dissemination by Health Professionals Associations (PCOR-DHPA) (R18) (March 28, 2012)


Letter of Intent Due Date: April 2, 2012

Application Due Date(s): April 25, 2012

Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): Approximately eight months after the application due date.



This FOA supports dissemination of existing knowledge about what health care options (including diagnoses, treatments, interventions, health services systems, and models of health care delivery) work best for patients, rather than generation of new knowledge. Examples of existing research appear on AHRQ-related Websites and publications (http://www.ahrq.gov, http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/,http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/index.cfm). The professional literature provides additional sources of patient-centered outcome research. Applications may propose dissemination of the results of AHRQ-related research, findings published by PCORI, and/or other government-funded research relevant to comparative clinical effectiveness research. In the latter case, the disseminated research should have validity, generalizability, accuracy, reliability, precision, usability, etc. comparable or superior to AHRQ-related results.

This FOA solicits applications from health professionals associations to develop dissemination programs that integrate patient-centered outcomes research into clinical practice using multi-factorial mechanisms such as education, credentialing, scientific programs, social media platforms, and other innovative methods. Applicants may wish to consider both educational theory (what learning methods work most effectively) and the relevance of "new media." Experiments with computer-based training, long distance learning, broadcasting, videos, and other technologies have had mixed results. More recent developments such smart phones, social networking (community-based sites, third-party anonymous sites, crowd-sourcing), Internet games, social media, blogs, online message boards, virtual communities, podcasting, etc. remain largely untested for their effectiveness in promoting health. Accordingly, voluminous opportunities exist for assessment of these innovations.



For more information please visit:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HS-12-006.html

First European Wise-Anderson Protocol (Stanford Protocol) Training for Physiotherapists and Physicians (March 13, 2012)


First European Wise-Anderson Protocol (Stanford Protocol) Training for Physiotherapists and Physicians for the for the treatment of prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

The training program will consist of training in the physiotherapy and relaxation protocols by David Wise, PhD and Tim Sawyer, PT who developed the method and continue to treat patients with it in California in a 6 day immersion clinic of what is called the Wise-Anderson (Stanford Protocol). The program is based on the material published A Headache in the Pelvis by Rodney Anderson and David Wise and the physical therapy protocol of Tim Sawyer.

This is the first time training in Wise-Anderson Protocol has been available in Europe to Physiotherapists, physicians and other qualified professionals. The training will occur on April 21-22. Please email Dr. Wise at ahip@sonic.net or call 707 332 1492 for details.

Macrolides for the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis (February 22, 2012)




We are very pleased to bring you this research. The lead author is Dr Gianpaolo Perlitti. You can find the whole article by following the instructions below and see the whole content. Prostatitis Foundation

Mol Med Report. 2011 Nov-Dec;4(6):1035-44. doi: 10.3892/mmr.2011.575. Epub 2011 Aug 25
.
Macrolides for the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis: an effective application of their unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile (Review).
Perletti G, Skerk V, Magri V, Markotic A, Mazzoli S, Parnham MJ, Wagenlehner FM, Naber KG.
Source
Department of Biomedical, Inf., Comm. and Env. Sciences, University of Insubria, Busto A, I-21052 Varese, Italy. gianpaolo.perletti@uninsubria.it

Abstract
Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is a persistent infection of the prostate characterized by poor quality of life mainly due to frequent relapse episodes caused by incomplete eradication of causative pathogens. Aggressive antibacterial therapy is required to attenuate the severe symptoms of CBP and to achieve a permanent cure. Although fluoroquinolones are currently recommended as first-choice agents, macrolide antibiotics are emerging as a noteworthy option for the treatment of CBP. Macrolide antibiotics are characterized by an impressive array of distinct pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties. These properties include high intracellular accumulation in phagocytes and at sites of infection, including the prostate; broad antibiotic but also biofilm-inhibiting properties; immunomodulating and inflammation-resolving activities. These features offer particular advantages for the treatment of chronic infections of the prostate gland, which are not easily amenable to drug therapy. Macrolides may be exploited to counteract the unsatisfactory rates of clinical symptom improvement and pathogen eradication. The results of a number of clinical trials support this proposal.

PMID: 21874250 (number of article in medline to search for)
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Contents
1. Prostatitis; definition, clinical implications and mechanistic issues
2. Treatment options for chronic bacterial prostatitis
3. Optimal pharmacokinetic characteristics of antibacterial
agents in the prostate. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/
pharmacodynamics of macrolides
4. Pharmacodynamics of macrolides: structure, antibacterial
activity, resistance issues
5. Pharmacodynamics of macrolides: non-antibiotic pharmacological
properties
6. Macrolide administration: safety issues
7. Two pivotal macrolide targets in the prostate gland: intracellular bacteria and biofilms
8. Clinical evidence of efficacy of macrolides in prostate infections: monotherapy
9. Clinical evidence of efficacy of macrolides in prostate infections: combination therapy.
10 Conclusions

On February 4-7, Davos is hosting the European Urology Forum 2012. (January 7, 2012)

Get ready for the European Urology Forum 2012

On February 4-7, Davos is hosting the European Urology Forum 2012. Taking place mere weeks before the Annual EAU Congress, the Forum has an identity all of its own. The meeting strives to look beyond established boundaries, and the Urological Challenge that takes place over the course of the Forum's days is a unique chance for young urologists to prove themselves before a panel of experts.


Release of a new funding announcement NIDDK (Benign Urology) (December 21, 2011)

The National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is pleased to announce the release of a new funding announcement titled “Planning Centers for Interdisciplinary Research in Benign Urology (IR-BU) (P20).” The application due date is March 20, 2012. Please be advised that, although not required, a letter of intent is strongly encouraged to be received by KUH by February 20, 2012. The RFA is available at http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-12-003.html.

The NIDDK encourages individuals and organizations to promote and disseminate this RFA information in related newsletters, publications, or on organizational websites. To request additional information, please contact Dr. Deborah Hoshizaki at HoshizakiD@niddk.nih.gov.


How to Find Good Doctor and get a Good Diagnosis (December 6, 2011)

The Prostatitis Foundation hears from many patients who want to know if they have a correct diagnosis and, how to find a good doctor. If you go to a website called in Need of a Diagnosis at www.inod.org you can find some interesting articles they put together all in one website about such decisions, search for.
OpEd: Dr. House Where are you?? –Marianne Genetti Executive Director of www. inod.org
Go to left column and click on inod articles/videos, when there click on articles of interest to see more articles.
How to find a Good Doctor-Theo Francis in Wall Street Journal
What to Do when your Doctor Doesn’t Know? Mary A Fischer. In AARP Magazine July2011
Many Causes of Illnesses Leave Doctors Baffled- Dr Richard T. Bosshart. For Orlando Sentinel May 30, 2007

Website with information about finding good doctors (December 3, 2011)

The Prostatitis Foundation hears from many patients who want to know if they have a correct diagnosis and, how to find a good doctor. If you go to a website called in Need of a Diagnosis at www.inod.org you can find some interesting articles they put together all in one website about such decisions, search for:
OpEd: Dr. House Where are you?? –Marianne Genetti Executive Director of www.inod.org

Go to left column and click on inod articles/videos, when there click on articles of interest to see more articles.
How to find a Good Doctor-Theo Francis in Wall Street Journal
What to Do when your Doctor Doesn’t Know? Mary A Fischer.
Many Causes of Illnesses Leave Doctors Baffled- Dr Richard T. Bosshart.

Study of Chronic Pelvic pain (October 29, 2011)


The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network (http://www.mappnetwork.org/) is conducting collaborative research on urological chronic pelvic pain disorders—specifically, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS).

The MAPP study design looks beyond simply the prostate and the bladder for the causes of disease. This national research network includes Discovery Sites that are conducting multidisciplinary research studies, a Data Coordinating Core that is coordinating data collection and analysis, and a Tissue Analysis and Technology Core that is coordinating and analyzing tissue samples.

The MAPP Network is currently recruiting CP/CPPS patients to participate in network studies. Patients are highly encouraged to contact a network recruiting site, as meeting our recruitment goals for males is critical to addressing our central goals of understanding the natural history and underlying causes of CP/CPPS.

MAPP Network Recruiting Sites include:

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Miami, FL
Project Leader: Thomas M. Hooton, MD
Contact for Patients: Nadege L. Atis (305) 243-4423; natis@med.miami.edu

University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, AL
Project Leader: Timothy J. Ness, MD, Ph.D.
Contact for Patients: Beverly Corbitt (205) 934-3751; bcorbitt@uab.edu

University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
Site Directors: Daniel J. Clauw, MD and Quentin Clemens, MD, MSCI
Contact for Patients: Megan Halvorson (734) 998-6839; meganeb@med.umich.edu

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, IL
Site Directors: David J. Klumpp, Ph.D. and Anthony J. Schaeffer, MD
Contact for Patients: Darlene Marko (312) 695-3898; d-marko@northwestern.edu

Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis, MO
Site Directors: Gerald L. Andriole, MD and H. Henry Lai, MD
Contact for Patients: Vivien Gardner (314) 996-8285; gardnerv@wudosis.wustl.edu

University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA
Site Director: Karl Kreder, MD, MBA
Contact for Patients: Mary Eno (319) 384-9265; mary-eno@uiowa.edu

University of Washington
Seattle, WA
Site Director: Dedra Buchwald, MD
Contact for Patients: T. J. Sundsvold (206) 616-4497; mapprc@uw.edu or tsundsvo@u.washington.edu

Stanford University
Palo Alto, CA
Project Leader: Sean Mackey, MD, Ph.D.
Contact for Patients: Noorulain Noor (650) 724-0525; snapl@stanford.edu
Rebecca McCue (650) 724-0522; rmccue@stanford.edu

David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Los Angeles, CA
Site Directors: Emeran A. Mayer, MD and Larissa V. Rodriguez, MD
Contacts for Patients: Suzanne Smith (310) 206-0310; srsmith@mednet.ucla.edu
Jennifer Soh (310) 206-1757; jsoh@mednet.ucla.edu

Note by Prostatitis Foundation:
Most of these sites would like to recruit patients within one hundred miles of their facilities so the follow up visits, if required, will not be too difficult to do.

Agenda for first morning Momus Meeting- See front page of Prostatitis.org (October 20, 2011)

Agenda
Monday, November 14, 2011
7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Registration
8:30 – 8:45 a.m. Introduction and Opening Remarks
Griffin Rodgers, Janine Clayton, and Ziya Kirkali

I. Public Health Importance of Measuring Symptomatic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction (LUTD)
Moderator: Kevin McVary
8:45 – 9:00 a.m. We Are All Happy, Why Bother?
Paul Abrams
9:00 – 9:15 a.m. Public Health Importance of Measuring LUTD Symptoms
Mark Litwin
9:15 – 9:30 a.m. CMS Perspective on Why Measure and Measure Well
Daniel Schwartz
9:30 – 9:45 a.m. Can Intervention for Symptoms Always Provide Patient Goal Achievement?
William Lawrence
9:45 – 10:00 a.m. Measurement of PRO – The PROMIS initiative
William Riley
10:00 – 10:15 a.m. PRO in the Evaluation of Medical Products for Regulatory Approval
Laurie Burke
10:15 – 10:30 a.m. Discussion
10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Break

II. Patient-focused Approach to an Invisible Condition
Moderator: Lisa Begg
10:45 – 10:55 a.m. What I Expected and Found After Prostatectomy
Robert Wedgworth
10:55 – 11:05 a.m. Do Drugs Really Do it for Me?
Patient
11:05 – 11:15 a.m. Am I Aged Enough to Develop Urinary Symptoms? Wait; and Pain?
Patient
11:15 – 11:25 a.m. I Accept Urinating Frequently, but This Pain Is Wearing Me Out
Laura Santurri
11:25 – 11:35 a.m. Is it My Destiny to Leak?
Patient
11:35 – 11:45 a.m. Cured of Prostate Cancer, but…
Harry "Doug" Swank
11:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Discussion
12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch

“Professional Society Programs to Promote Diversity (R25) (October 13, 2011)

The National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is pleased to announce the release of a new funding announcement titled “Professional Society Programs to Promote Diversity (R25).” The application due date is December 22, 2011. Please be advised that, although not required, a letter of intent is strongly encouraged to be received by NIDDK by November 22, 2011. The RFA is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-11-014.html.



The NIDDK encourages individuals and organizations to promote and disseminate this RFA information in related newsletters, publications, or on organizational websites. To request additional information, please contact Dr. Kevin McBryde, kevin.mcbryde@nih.gov.

Keep in touch with your representative and senators (September 14, 2011)

This summer, House of Representatives’ subcommittee is scheduled to review the budget which funds the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The subcommittee is expected to produce a bill that spends significantly less on these programs. Please contact your representative now and encourage him/her to support the needs of prostatitis patients in this bill.
• Don’t know who your representative is? Go to www.house.gov and enter your zip code.
• Calling works best—and phone numbers for all Congressional offices are also listed on www.house.gov.
• If you prefer to communicate via e-mail, you can do so through www.house.go

Also remind the NIH that we are waiting to know the cause, cure and how to prevent prostatitis. www.nih.gov

Meeting at the NIH - Prostatitis Patients Needed (August 4, 2011)

Meeting at the NIH - Prostatitis patients needed
Meeting on Measurement of Urinary Symptoms
MOMUS
November 14¬-15, 2011
Natcher Building - Main Auditorium, NIH Campus, Bethesda, MD.
Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is a common group of symptoms seen in men and women. Both incidence and prevalence rates increase with age; consequently, treatment costs pose a major financial challenge to the nation. The American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score, which was initially intended for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients, is widely used in clinical practice. In addition, it is often used as an endpoint in most clinical trials to assess symptom-based clinical improvement in benign lower urinary tract disease. Using the current AUA symptom score may not only be misleading clinically and correlate weakly with patient satisfaction, but also can be scientifically invalid and impede scientific progress. Thus; a better measurement tool which focuses on patient reported outcomes (PRO) is essential to quantify early, late, transient, and persistent LUTS in men and women and in all age groups.
The goal of this meeting is to increase discussion about this topic among various populations with different expertise: urologists, patients, other clinicians, researchers, industry, advocacy groups, and various government agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Meeting Objectives:
A. Discuss the uses and shortcomings of current symptom-based instruments in research of lower urinary tract disorders.
B. Disseminate state-of-the-art methodology to improve PRO of LUTS.
C. Discuss the validation and qualification process of new measurement tools.
D. Align the new LUTS measurement tool among involved parties.
---------------------
Note from Prostatitis Foundation (PF)
They want to encourage patients to attend. They would like to hear what prostatitis patients have to say. WE should be there to tell them our experiences. We will have to watch their webpage for further details.
They will be posting information on the NIDDK KUH’s home page to provide updates. Please visit: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/KUH/KUHHome and look on the right hand navigation bar under “Upcoming Meetings” for more information.

Transition From Acute to Chronic Pain (July 26, 2011)


Funding Opportunity:

Title: Collaborative Research on the Transition From Acute to Chronic Pain: New Models and Measures in Clinical and Preclinical Pain Research (R01)

For additional information, please visit:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-12-008.html




Article about search for a cause and cure of prostatitis (June 9, 2011)

An article from the NIDDK: Recent Advances and Emerging Opportunities is available on the prostatitis.org website by clicking on the lead in on the opening page of the website. Look for the link-in right under the two top books. It explains where Dr Shaffer from Northwestern University believes we are at in the search for a cause and cure for prostatitis. It should be of interest to anyone or the family of anyone who is dealing with prostatitis.

NVA Invites Medical Research Proposals (May 13, 2011)

Members of the medical-scientific community, please circulate this announcement to your colleagues and/or your department listserv.

Non-profit and medical organizations, please distribute this announcement to your professional members.

NVA Invites Medical Research Proposals

The NVA invites US and foreign researchers to submit proposals on the epidemiology (prevalence, incidence, risk factors), etiology, diagnosis and/or treatment of Generalized Vulvodynia and/or Provoked Vestibulodynia (aka vulvar vestibulitis syndrome).

The maximum grant amount is $30,000 and we require confirmation that all funds will be applied to direct research costs, not institutional costs. If you are interested in applying, please submit a one or two page letter of intent to Christin Veasley (chris@nva.org) by June 10, 2011, outlining the following:

- Name and professional background of the primary investigator
- Study objective(s) and time frame
- Budget summary

NVA will email application guidelines following receipt of your letter of intent. Completed applications are due Monday, July 15, 2011 at 5pm EST.

If you have previously submitted a proposal, you are invited to re-apply. Summaries of previously funded studies can be viewed on NVA's web site.

We welcome correspondence about potential projects. To discuss your proposal, please contact Christin Veasley via email (chris@nva.org) or phone (401-398-0830).







Complimentary and Alternative Medicines? (May 12, 2011)

The May 2011 issue of Consumer Reports on page twelve carried an article titled, Your doctor as salesman. The author was Orly Avitzur M. D., a board certified neurologist and medical advisor to Consumers Reports.
One comment she made was, ”Selling supplements might yield a handsome profit to some doctors. But having a financial stake in promoting any health product to patients represents a serious conflict of interest.

More information listed at these recommended sites:
Food and Drug Administraton fda.gov/food/dietarysupplements,
National Center for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, nccam.nih.gov,
Office of Dietary Supplements, thr National Institutes of Health, ods.od.nih.gov,
Consumer Reports Health ,consumer reports health.org

Basic Urological Research (April 29, 2011)

Pure science: 9th World Congress on Urological Research

The European Section of Urological Research is pleased to announce the 9th World Congress on Urological Research which will take place in Innsbruck, Austria, on 15-17 September 2011. Organised together with the American Society for Basic Urological Research (SBUR), the central theme concerns “Molecular Pathology and Experimental Models of Urological Diseases”.


New book About Prostatitis (April 20, 2011)

I am glad to inform you that one of our prostatitis books is already
available in CreateSpace e-store. It should appear soon in Amazon as well.
The second book is coming soon.

https://www.createspace.com/3582797

Notice from Estonia to Prostatitis Foundation about information we have asked them to make availablle to prostatitis patients worldwide

Solicitation for Collaborative Projects for the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) Program (April 4, 2011)

From: Tinkler, Emily (NIH/NIDDK) [E]

Subject: JUST ANNOUNCED: NHGRI Solicitation
Date: Mon, Apr 4, 2011 10:46 am

Solicitation for Collaborative Projects for the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) Program (NOT-HG-11-018)
National Human Genome Research Institute
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HG-11-018.html

The National Human Genome Research Institute, with other NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) NIH Office of Rare Diseases, intends to promote a new initiative by publishing a Request for Applications (RFA) to solicit applications for research on the following: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program is a new Congressionally mandated program that performs preclinical and early clinical development of new drugs for rare and neglected diseases, and develops new technologies and paradigms to improve the efficiency of therapeutic development for these diseases. The operational model of TRND is collaboration between intramural NIH drug development scientists and partners having promising leads and disease/target knowledge but lacking the expertise or resources to develop these projects into clinical stage programs attractive to biopharmaceutical or other suitable organizations. TRND is establishing collaborations with researchers in the public and private sectors to together “de-risk” Rare and Neglected disease drug development projects by accomplishing lead optimization through an FDA Investigational New Drug (IND) application and, when needed, proof-of-concept human studies.

To apply to the TRND program, please visit the TRND webpage at http://trnd.nih.gov.

The application deadline for the first cycle of the program is April 26th, 2011.

Contact these people now!!Ask for prostatitis research funding (April 3, 2011)

Subcommittee on Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies

Majority Members: 10 Total Members: 18
Minority Members: 8

Harkinr, Tom (IA), Chairman
Inouye, Daniel K. (HI)
Kohl, Herb (WI)
Murray, Patty (WA)
Landrieu, Mary L. (LA)
Durbin, Richard J. (IL)
Reed, Jack (RI)
Pryor, Mark L. (AR)
Mikulski, Barbara A. (MD)
Brown, Sherrod (OH) Shelby, Richard C. (AL), Ranking Member
Cochran, Thad (MS)
Hutchison, Kay Bailey (TX)
Alexander, Lamar (TN)
Johnson, Ron (WI)
Kirk, Mark (IL)
Graham, Lindsey (SC)
Moran, Jerry (KS)

The 20th Annual Perspectives in Urology (March 29, 2011)

Mark Your Calendar!
The 20th Annual
Perspectives in Urology: Point CounterPoint

November 10 - 12, 2011, Scottsdale, Arizona
This year's meeting will be held at the
InterContinental Montelucia, Scottsdale, Arizona
Visit Website

Course Director: E. David Crawford, MD, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

Registration is now open at www.perspectivesinurology.com

For questions or further information please write:
balvarez@grantdowning.com
or call 303-407-3411

Copyright © 2011 GrantDowning Education, All rights reserved.
For urologists and physicians interested in men's health issues
Our mailing address is:
GrantDowning Education
600 Grant St
Suite 510
Denver, Colorado 80203

Add us to your address book

The countdown has begun at EUA. (March 18, 2011)


Only a few more days before we welcome you to Vienna and Europe's largest urology event. The preparations are at the final stage: the congress bags are packed and ready to be handed out to the delegates, the cameras are set up and the exhibition build up is in progress.
I hope that you will join us this week at the ACV Centre, and engage first hand with the very best of international urology!

Per-Anders Abrahamsson
EAU Secretary General

Scientists Learn to Block Pain at Its Source (March 18, 2011)

Scientists Learn to Block Pain at Its Source: New Non-Addictive Painkillers from Substance Similar to Ingredient in Hot Chili Peppers
ScienceDaily (Apr. 27, 2010) — A substance similar to capsaicin, which gives chili peppers their heat, is generated at the site of pain in the human body. Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have discovered how to block these capsaicin-like molecules and created a new class of non-addictive painkillers.

Request for Individual Research Proposals (March 17, 2011)


Urologic Diseases in America (UDA) Request for Individual Research Proposals

http://udaonline.net/rirp2011/v2011

Application Deadline: May 2, 2011

The Urologic Diseases in America (UDA) project is pleased to announce the second Request for Individual Research Proposals. Successful applicants will be designated as UDA collaborators and will receive analytic support from the UDA team to refine their hypothesis, develop their analytic methods, conduct their analyses (programming performed by RAND), interpret their findings, and provide feedback on their resulting manuscripts and abstracts. All proposals must be submitted online through www.udaonline.net in accordance with the posted requirements. Please contact the Project Manager, Sylvia Lambrechts, for further inquiries at slambrechts@mednet.ucla.edu.




6-Day Intensive Treatment Protocol for Refractory Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (March 11, 2011)

J Urol. 2011 Feb 18. [Epub ahead of print]
6-Day Intensive Treatment Protocol for Refractory Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Using Myofascial Release and Paradoxical Relaxation Training.

Anderson RU, Wise D, Sawyer T, Glowe P, Orenberg EK.

Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford.
Abstract

PURPOSE: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome continues to elude conventional therapy. Evidence supports the concept that phenotypes of pelvic muscular tenderness and psychosocial distress respond to myofascial trigger point release and specific relaxation training. This case series reports long-term outcomes of a 6-day intensive combination of such therapies in refractory cases.

PMID: 21334027 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

See a video link that that contains video and article
http://www.thedoctorschannel.com/video/4146.html

Contact your senators and congressman now for research support (March 2, 2011)

The time has come for each patient, or a family member, or both to take action to maintain the research underway for prostatitis/pelvic pain syndrome. The Appropriations Subcommittee for Health and Human Services is now considering funding recommendations for
the National Institute of Health. It is important for each of us to ask our congressional representatives to do anything they can to maintain the funding for this long running but so far unsuccessful research. It will be necessary to call or email each of your two senators and your congressional representative immediately. Letters will not work through the system fast enough at this stage of deliberations. You can contact your senators or representatives through www.congress.org. Emails or phone calls would be great.

Tell them how you have suffered and how it has affected your work and family life. Tell them ten percent of the male population is suffering at any given time. Tell them it is a disease of younger men who are reluctant to discuss the symptoms among their family and co-workers. Many patients go from doctor to doctor searching for a cure. The possible relationship to prostate cancer in older men is not fully understood or researched adequately.

Prostatitis Foundation

(February 15, 2011)

At the Prostatitis Foundation we try to avoid prostate cancer involvement as there are other well run organizations that focus on prostate cancer(PC)primarily, as we do prostatitis. We do not wish to duplicate the good work they have been doing. PC does keep coming up however as we get questions about a possible progression from prostatitis to prostate cancer quite often, especially from patients with family members who have suffered with prostate cancer.

We recently received a copy of the book titled, “ Invasion of the Prostate Snatchers.” It was written by a PC patient and his doctor who were both PC victims. They are Ralph H. Blum and Mark Scholz, MD

Even though we think the progression from one to the other is rare it can happen and prostatitis does raise the PSA as does cancer. For those who worry about the possibility of that progression happening to you we think you should read the book: "Invasion of the Body Snatchers” before complications arise, if they ever do. It is available on Amazon.com.

While the Prostatitis Foundation does not endorse any doctor, medicine or treatment protocol we do try to make available any pertinent information. Make any decisions with your doctors assistance.

Prostatitis Foundation

Call for Abstracts Society of Infection and Inflammation 2011 Society for Infection and Inflammation (February 2, 2011)

Call for Abstracts

Society for Infection and Inflammation in Urology and the AUA

2011 Meeting

Grand Hyatt Washington
Independence F&G

1000 H Street NW

Washington DC

Sunday May 15, 2011
1:00 to 5:00 pm


Abstract Submission Deadline: April 15, 2011

The SIIU invites you to submit brief abstracts on the topic of infection and inflammation in urology for presentation at the 2011 annual meeting. The meeting will include a poster session in which a portion of the accepted abstracts will be presented. There will be no podium presentation of abstracts.

Abstracts should be prepared in standard American Urological Association format and submitted by email or fax by April 15, 2011, to:

Joe Downey

Queen’s University, Kingston, ON Canada

Email: downeyj@queensu.ca

Telephone: 613 548-7832

Fax: 613 548-7834

Please note that based on an agreement the SIIU has with the AUA, these abstracts must be independent from any projects or abstracts approved for the AUA meeting unless the poster is being submitted by a New Investigator to be eligible for consideration for SIIU award (the poster must fit the “infection and inflammation” profile of the society).

You will receive an email acknowledgment of your abstract submission and email notification if your abstract is accepted.

Please direct any questions concerning abstract submissions to Joe Downey at the telephone number and email address indicated above.


Joe Downey MSc CCRP
Centre for Applied Urological Research (CAUR)
Financial and Regulatory Affairs Administrator
Department of Urology
62 Barrie Street
Kingston General Hospital
at Queen's University
Kingston, ON Canada K7L 3J7
613 548-7832
613 548-7834 (fax)



Prostatitis and Uretheral Strictures (January 24, 2011)



Doctor Gelman has volunteered some good new information about prostatitis and uretheral strictures for the website which can be found at www.prostatitis.org.strictures. He has included some very good pictures and diagrams. You can find his information and website at the end of the article.

Combination of Antibiotics (January 24, 2011)


Your site has been very helpful in my understanding of prostatitis, so I would like to add my experience to the site so that it may help others.

I was diagnosed with prostatitis about five and a half years ago. It was shortly after my wife and I had our first baby. I remember feeling pain in my scrotum and genital area, enough that it would keep me awake at night. I went to my family physician and was checked out - they could not find anything. Urine analysis turned up nothing, and blood work was negative as well. I was, at the time, a relatively healthy 37 year old. My family doctor suggested I see a urologist, so I set up an appointment with a local one. The pain continued.

Urologist was helpful, letting me know about prostatitis, that he sees many men my age with this problem. Ran more tests, always turned up nothing. Ultrasound of scrotum was fine. Semen culture was negative. A course of antibiotics (Cipro, as I recall) made me feel a bit better, but after I finished the prescription, the pain would return. The urologist recommended all the standard stuff - warm baths, massage, a quercitin (sp?) supplement. When the pain would flare up more than usual, I would go get a new prescription - sometimes it would be cipro, sometimes we would try levaquin. Sometimes azithromycin. I got to know the various types of antibiotics well. For each one when I would start them they would help, but when finished, the pain would return. I would take four weeks of the drugs sometimes (if the side effects were minimum). If the side effects were too unpleasant, I would stop taking them. Levaquin was like that - the drug would really make my tendons very sore, especially in my arms.

This went on for years. The pain would come and go. My family doctor was very understanding - he would help with prescriptions, so I didn't have to pay the "specialist fee" my health plan charged to go to the urologist. Every time I thought I had it "beat", it would come back with a vengeance. Of course, I realized I never would "beat" prostatitis - the urologist told me I would have it for life, and would have to manage it the best I could. One pharmacist, who asked if I was filling such a big antibiotic prescription because of prostatitis (as he had it as well), told me that if I live long enough, the prostatitis will eventually cause prostate cancer. Thanks for the counter-side manner, buddy.

Well, what really bothered me was that all the tests never showed what was causing this problem. No bacteria were ever present. It didn't hurt to urinate or ejactulate - it just would be a dull pain in my scrotum area. According to the urologist, that was normal. Nothing showed up in the tests. That never sat well with me. I used to think it had something to do with having sex with my wife. Sometimes a flare up would occur after sex - but my doctor (Urologist) assured me that was just coincidental.

I started to compile charts which would show what medicines worked best against which bacteria. Even though none of the bacteria showed up in my tests, I figured that since I generally felt a bit better when taking antibiotics, that may mean that the antibiotics must be killing off something inside me.

After a recent painful flare up, I decided to try something a bit different. I thought I would try multiple types of antibiotics either at once or in quick succession. I didn't discuss this with my doctor, but I did check online for any potential problems/drug interactions. I took a three week course of Levaquin (500mg a day), followed by a three day course of Cipro (500 mg twice a day), followed by 1g of Azithromycin. Total days on antibiotics - 25, with the azithromycin probably taking a few days to get out of my system.

Ok, I know you are probably thinking this is a bit extreme. But you also may be thinking like me - try it, see what happens. You are totally fed up with the pain and not knowing what else to do. Taking a lot of antibiotics like that will certainly cause some gastro-intestinal issues and other issues, like the aforementioned tendonitis from so much Levaquin. It's no picnic.

But I'll be damned - I've been symptom free for over two months now. This is easily the longest I've ever gone without a twitch or pain. I used to sit at my desk at work and feel the pain bad enough where I would have to get up a walk around every once in a while. And at night, on particulary bad nights, I would not get any sleep at all. What a tremendous difference I have experienced. I don't know if it was the combination of medications but it certainly seems that way to me. Has anyone else tried something like this?

Well, if this helps someone, that's great. Or, you may think I'm crazy for doing this. But I do know what I feel, and damn it, I FEEL GREAT for the first time in a long time.

Best of luck to you.
C-Man

CLINICAL TRIALS TO FIGHT ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE (October 22, 2010)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Embargoed for Release: Tuesday, October 19, 2010, 11 a.m. EDT

NIH FUNDS FOUR CLINICAL TRIALS TO FIGHT ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE
Eight large NIH trials now seeking to preserve the usefulness of licensed antibiotics

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced four new contracts for large-scale clinical trials that address the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Over the next five to six years, these new clinical trials will evaluate treatment alternatives for diseases for which antibiotics are prescribed most often, including acute otitis media (middle ear infections), community-acquired pneumonia and diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which frequently are resistant to first-line antibiotics. Each trial will enroll at least 1,000 participants who have been diagnosed with these illnesses and diseases.

"Many infectious diseases are increasingly difficult to treat because bacteria and other microbes have developed resistance to commonly used antimicrobial drugs," says NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "Research to preserve the effectiveness of licensed antibiotics is a critical priority for the Institute. With these new contracts, NIAID now supports a total of eight large clinical trials in this arena."

Antimicrobial research has changed significantly since many current drugs were developed, says Dennis M. Dixon, Ph.D., chief of NIAID's Bacteriology and Mycology Branch. "Years ago, we were not as focused on antimicrobial resistance because there was generally another class of drug in the research and development pipeline. Today, the development of new antimicrobials is moving much more slowly than the evolution of resistance to existing treatments, so we need to preserve the drugs we have." ****************

Edit for space limitations--------This NIH News Release is available online at:
.

Dr Krongrad's Blogs (October 10, 2010)

Read Dr Krongrad's Blogs this week at this location

http://blog.prostatitissurgery.com/2010/08/07/45-years-of-prostatitis.aspx

New Clues to Chronic Pelvic Pain (October 7, 2010)

WebMD has an interesting article about referred pain in women that would be applicable to men also I believe at:
http://women.webmd.com/news/20101001/new-clues-to-chronic-pelvic-pain?ecd=wnl_cbp_100710

FUNDS AWARDED FOR DISEASE DEMONSTRATION STUDIES (September 8, 2010)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
For Immediate Release: Wednesday, September 8, 2010

CONTACT: Geoff Spencer, NHGRI, 301-402-0911,

FUNDS AWARDED FOR DISEASE DEMONSTRATION STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

The National Institutes of Health today announced it has awarded approximately $42 million to expand the scope of eight demonstration projects designed to link changes in the human microbiome to health and disease. The funds will also support investigators to develop innovative technologies to improve the identification and characterization of microbial communities of the human microbiome.

The human microbiome comprises all the microorganisms that reside in or on the human body. It consists of beneficial and harmful microbes that include bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes.

The expanded disease demonstration projects are part of the Human Microbiome Project, a $157 million, five-year effort launched in 2008 as part of the NIH Common Fund's Roadmap for Medical Research. The project will produce a resource for researchers seeking to understand the function of the human microbiome in health and disease and to provide strategies to develop new therapies that manipulate the human microbiome to improve health.

In 2009, the project funded 15 year-long pilot disease demonstration projects that sampled the microbiomes of healthy volunteers and volunteers with specific diseases at body sites thought to have a microbiome association. The seven body sites sampled were the digestive tract, the mouth, the skin, the nose, the vagina, the blood and the male urethra. After one year, each pilot project was evaluated based on progress toward milestones and the ability of each study to demonstrate a definable relationship between a body site microbiome and a specific disease.

"Preliminary evidence from several of the project's pilot demonstration disease projects suggests that a significant relationship exists between changes in the human microbiome and human health and disease," said National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., co-chair of the Human Microbiome Project's Implementation Group. "We are providing additional support to those studies that hold the most promise for improving our understanding of how human health and disease are influenced by the human microbiome."

Scientific review of the pilot demonstration projects was conducted to determine which studies would be expanded based on several criteria, including: the potential of each study to achieve the goals of the disease demonstration program; its clinical significance; and which had the strongest scientific merit. Generally, the expansion of each study includes the additional recruitment of study volunteers, more robust sequencing analyses of the human microbiome and stronger statistical tests applied the additional samples.

The eight expanded disease demonstration projects listed by principal investigator, body site(s), disease focus and approximate first-year funding levels are:

Gregory A. Buck, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
Vagina: Bacterial Vaginosis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
$ 6.9 million (3 years)
This study will measure changes in the vaginal microbiome and its association with environmental factors, the presence of diseases and a woman's genetic makeup.

J. Dennis Fortenberry, M.D., Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
Male urethra: Puberty, Sexual Activity and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
$4.2 million (3 years)
Samples will be collected from an ethnically diverse group of male adolescents to characterize the male urethral microbiome and its association with puberty, sexual activity and sexually transmitted disease.

Zhiheng Pei, M.D., Ph.D., NYU School of Medicine
Mouth and digestive tract: Esophageal Adenocarcinoma
$5.2 million (3 years)
This team will sample the oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach to study the relationship of the microbiome from these body sites with gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and with esophageal cancer.

Julie Segre, Ph.D., National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Md.
Skin and nose: Atopic Dermatitis, Immunodeficiency Syndromes
$3.1 million (3 years)
The goal of this study is to examine the microbiomes of the skin and nose in patients with an inflammatory skin disease called atopic dermatitis. Researchers will look for associations between the microbiomes, genetic factors associated with atopic dermatitis, and with immunodeficiency syndromes.

Phillip I. Tarr, M.D., Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis
Digestive tract: Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis
$5.2 million (3 years)
This group of researchers will examine the potential connection between the intestinal microbiome and the development of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, a gastrointestinal disorder in premature infants, in which portions of the bowel undergo tissue death.

James Versalovic, M.D., Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine, Houston
Digestive tract: Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
$3.4 million (3 years)
This project will examine the composition of the intestinal microbiome and possible connections with irritable bowel syndrome in children.

Gary D. Wu, M.D., University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia
Digestive tract: Crohn's Disease
$1.1 million (1 year)
In children, Crohn's disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease, is clinically treated through diet. This team will investigate whether these specialized diet regimes work by altering the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Partial funding for this project will be provided by NIH's Office of Dietary Supplements.

Vincent B. Young, M.D., Ph.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Digestive tract: Ulcerative Colitis
$8.2 million (3 years)
Some patients who suffer from ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation and sores in the lining of the rectum and colon, are treated with surgical removal of the colon, followed by construction of a pouch to assist the patient with bowel movements. For unknown reasons, some patients develop inflammation of the pouch, necessitating further surgery. This research will determine whether the composition of the pouch microbiome influences the onset and progression of pouch inflammation.

Historically, microbes have been studied in the laboratory as cultures of isolated species. Microbial growth is dependent upon a very specific natural environment, and it is often difficult to duplicate these conditions in a laboratory. Therefore, the development of novel and innovative technologies is needed to improve and refine the identification and characterization of the microbes that comprise the complex mixtures found in and on our bodies.

The principal investigators who will develop new technologies, their approximate funding levels and their areas of research are:

Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D., University of Guelph, Ontario
$179,000 (2 years)
A Method to Sort and Enrich the as-yet Uncultured Bacterial Species from the Human Distal Gut

Ronald Davis, Ph.D., Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.
$440,000 (2 years)
Isolation, Selection and Polony Amplification of Single Cells in a Gel Matrix

David Fredricks, M.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle.
$2 million (3 years)
Novel Cultivation Methods for the Domestication of Vaginal Bacteria

Rustem Ismagilov, Ph.D., University of Chicago
$1.1 million (3 years)
Confining Single Cells to Enhance and Target Cultivation of Human Microbiome

Kim Lewis, Ph.D., Northeastern University, Boston
$1.2 million (3 years)
Culturing Uncultivatable Gut Microorganisms

John Nelson, Ph.D., General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, N.Y.
$538,000 (2 years)
Tools for Human Microbiome Studies

Analysis of the sequence data from the Human Microbiome Project also requires the development of new and novel computational approaches to study the associations of the microbiome with specific body sites and with specific diseases. Anticipated in fiscal year 2010, the Human Microbiome Project's computational tools program will award additional funds to produce bioinformatic tools for the research community to analyze microbiome diversity and to evaluate the human microbiome and disease progression.

More information about the Human Microbiome Project is available at and .

An illustration showing the body sites that will be sampled as part of the Human Microbiome Project is available at: .

A high resolution image of the bacteria, Entercoccus faecalis, a microbe that lives in the human gut, is available in color at , or in black and white at .



The Human Microbiome Project is funded through the Common Fund, and managed by the NIH Office of the Director in partnership with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Human Genome Research Institute, all part of NIH. The NIH Common Fund encourages collaboration and supports a series of exceptionally high impact, trans-NIH programs. Common Fund programs are designed to pursue major opportunities and gaps in biomedical research that no single NIH Institute could tackle alone, but that the agency as a whole can address to make the biggest impact possible on the progress of medical research. Additional information about the NIH Common Fund can be found at .

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .
------------------

Additional contacts:

NIH Office of Communications, 301-496-4461

NIAID News Office, 301-402-1663,
Trish Reynolds, NIAMS, 301-496-8190,
Bob Kuska, NIDCR, 301-594-7560,
Leslie Curtis, NIDDK, 301-496-3583, ##

This NIH News Release is available online at:
.

To subscribe (or unsubscribe) from this list, go to
.

From Dr Krongrad (September 3, 2010)

Like prostate cancer, prostatitis can be a chronic condition. It affects millions of men. It can ruin lives.

Why are we being arbitrary in the awareness of specific prostate conditions? This makes no sense.

It's time to act more thoughtfully. If you agree, please link to this page. You can just copy and paste it:

National Chronic Prostatitis Awareness Month

New Opportunity for Urologic Disease Research (August 7, 2010)


Taken from AUA Newsletter (Eureka)

NIDDK Announces New Opportunity for Urologic Disease Research

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-DK-10-007.html

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) has announced that it will also accept applications for research relevant to kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases that fall within the mission of the NIDDK under PAR-08-181: Seeding Collaborative Interdisciplinary Team Science in Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases (R24). Specifically, applications can address a single large problem related to non-malignant, chronic and acute renal and urologic diseases, renal and urologic complications of diabetes, and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs including sickle cell disease, Cooley's anemia (thalassemia), and hemochromatosis.


(July 22, 2010)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
National Library of Medicine (NLM)
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
For Immediate Release: Wednesday, July 21, 2010

CONTACTS:
Stephanie Dailey, NIA, 301-496-1752,
Kathy Cravedi, NLM,301-496-6308,
Geoffrey Spencer, NHGRI,301-402-0911,

NIHSENIORHEALTH SITE OFFERS TIPS ON CREATING A FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY

At your next family reunion or gathering, consider discussing a different type of family tree-the family health history. Find out how to collect, organize and use information about your family's health at Creating a Family Health History (www.nihseniorhealth.gov/creatingafamilyhealthhistory/toc.html), the newest topic on the NIHSeniorHealth website. NIHSeniorHealth is a health and wellness website designed especially for older adults from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Library of Medicine (NLM), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

Older family members are uniquely positioned to help create a family health history. "Older adults are more likely to know about the health conditions of previous generations," says Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, M.D., M.B.A. "I like to think of the family health history as an heirloom that can help current and future generations live longer, healthier lives."

The topic on NIHSeniorHealth includes My Family Health Portrait , an online tool developed by National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Surgeon General's Office as a part of the Family History Initiative. The tool can help users pull together information about their own family health history. The topic also includes information about disease risk, the role of genetics and ways to promote the health of family members.

Knowing what diseases run in the family is important for you, your children and grandchildren. "A family health history, especially as one ages, can be used by health care providers to assess individual health risks and employ prevention strategies to avoid a variety of health conditions, from cardiovascular disease to cancer," says Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), which developed the topic for NIHSeniorHealth. "I encourage all Americans to take advantage of family gatherings this summer to make health history a topic of conversation. This information can save lives."

Older Americans are increasingly turning to the Internet for health information. In fact, more than 70 percent of online seniors look for health and medical information when they go on the Web. NIHSeniorHealth (www.nihseniorhealth.gov), which is based on the latest research on cognition and aging, features short, easy-to-read segments of information that can be accessed in a number of formats, including various large-print type sizes, open-captioned videos and an audio version. Additional topics coming soon to the site include alcohol use among older adults, long-term care, and anxiety disorders.

The NHGRI supports the development of resources and technology that will accelerate genome research and its application to human health. Additional information about NHGRI can be found at its website, .

The NLM is the world's largest library of the health sciences and collects, organizes and makes available biomedical science information to scientists, health professionals and the public. For more information, visit the website at .

The NIA leads the federal effort supporting and conducting research on aging and the medical, social and behavioral issues of older people. For more information on research and aging, go to
The Office of the Surgeon General, under the direction of the Surgeon General, oversees the operations of the 6,500-member Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service. For more information, visit the website at .

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .

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ADVERSE CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS REPORTED IN TESTOSTERONE TRIAL IN OLDER MEN: Treatment Phase of Clinical Trial Halted (July 1, 2010)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute on Aging (NIA),
Embargoed for Release: Wednesday, June 30, 2010, 5:01 p.m., EDT

CONTACT: Barbara Cire, 301-496-1752,

ADVERSE CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS REPORTED IN TESTOSTERONE TRIAL IN OLDER MEN
Treatment Phase of Clinical Trial Halted

A clinical trial of testosterone treatment in older men, reported June 30 online in the New England Journal of Medicine, has found a higher rate of adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and elevated blood pressure, in a group of older men receiving testosterone gel compared to those receiving placebo. Due to these events, the treatment phase of the trial was stopped. The study was supported by a grant to Shalender Bhasin, M.D., at Boston Medical Center from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Decreased muscle strength may contribute to difficulties in mobility, such as in walking or climbing stairs, which can limit older persons' independence. Testosterone treatment has been shown to improve muscle strength in some older men, but it is not yet known whether it would reduce mobility limitations in older men with low testosterone levels. The TOM (Testosterone in Older Men) Trial was designed to address this question. It was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the effects of six months of testosterone gel treatment on strength and ability to walk and climb stairs in 209 older men with low testosterone levels and mobility limitations. The testosterone gel used in this study was administered to the skin daily. The 209 men in the trial had an average age of 74 and high rates of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The treatment phase of the trial was stopped on Dec. 31, 2009, following a review by the study's Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). The DSMB is an independent panel of medical and statistical experts set up from the start of the trial to check regularly for the occurrence of adverse health events in participants and to detect any possible risks from treatment. In December 2009, the board found that 23 of the 106 men who had received testosterone experienced adverse cardiovascular-related events during the study, compared to five of the 103 men who received placebo. The cardiovascular-related events included heart attack, heart rhythm disturbances and elevated blood pressure, and one death from a suspected heart attack. The DSMB weighed the severity of the adverse events in relation to the potential benefits and recommended that participants stop taking study medications and that enrollment be stopped.

As soon as the DSMB made its recommendation, the treatment phase of the trial was halted. All participants were promptly notified and asked to meet with study physicians to discuss any questions they might have. The men who experienced cardiovascular events were treated by their personal physicians for their specific conditions. No new participants will be enrolled in the study. The study team will continue to monitor the health of all participants for at least another year after stopping testosterone use to further evaluate effects of the treatment.

The report in the New England Journal of Medicine provides detailed information about the outcomes and adverse events in participants. The authors note that physicians and patients, especially older men, should consider this study's findings on adverse effects along with other information on the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy. They also note that further research is needed to clarify the safety issues raised by this trial.

The authors caution that the ability to draw broader conclusions about the safety of testosterone therapy based on these findings is constrained by several factors, including this study's small size and the fact that the study's population was older and had higher rates of chronic diseases and mobility limitation than individuals in most other studies.

In addition, the trial's eligibility criteria excluded men with severely low testosterone levels, limiting the ability to make inferences about safety in this population. The authors also note that the testosterone doses and serum levels in this trial may be higher than those usually used in clinical practice and in some previous clinical trials.

NIA is funding six other trials studying the effects of testosterone. All of the principal investigators of those trials and their DSMBs and Safety Officers have been informed of the findings in the TOM Trial. After reviewing these findings, and other evidence relating to safety of testosterone treatment, the DSMBs and Safety Officers recommended continuation of the trials, with provision of additional information to participants and additional safety precautions. NIA has reviewed these recommendations and concurs with them.

The NIA leads the federal effort supporting and conducting research on aging and the medical, social and behavioral issues of older people. For more information on research and aging, go to .

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .

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How to request useful information about genetic and rare diseases (May 10, 2010)

The public may request useful information about genetic and rare diseases by contacting the Genetic And Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), , which provides immediate access to experienced information specialists who can furnish current and accurate information -- in both English and Spanish.

Taken from a NIH Press release

Food Allergy (May 10, 2010)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that food allergy affects nearly 4 percent of adults and teens and 5 percent of children under the age of 6 years. A recent report by the CDC indicates that the number of people diagnosed with food allergy increased by 18 percent over the last decade, and this highlights the need to help those affected by this disease.

For more information on food allergy visit NIAID's Food Allergy Web site (http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/foodAllergy/).

Prostatitis Information from John Hopkins White Papers (April 21, 2010)

Johns Hopkins has an excellent "white paper" on prostate disorders authored by H. Ballentine Carter, M.D. and published in 2009. Address: The Johns Hopkins White Papers, PO Box 420083 Palm Coast, FL 32142-0083. In the section on prostatitis (page 76), it states that Nearly 95% of men with prostatitis are believed to have the chronic nonbacterial form. That explains why all that Bactrim and Levaquin served only to make you feel sick and have insomnia, and didn't help your prostatitis. This paper mentions various treatments, including the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs are usually helpful. When I asked my doctor about Advil, he said it will not help. He obviously hadn't read this white paper. The paper also mentions that if ejaculation is not painful, masturbation may improve symptoms. Perhaps most importantly, the paper quotes a study which showed that acupuncture was nearly twice as effective as the sham procedure in relieving chronic prostatitis symptoms. I highly recommend this white paper.
Sent in by a patient

MAPP Research Network Sites Now Recruiting for Prostatitis Research Study!!! (April 2, 2010)



The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network has been established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to focus on a broader approach to the study of Chronic Prostatitis (CP)/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) in men and Interstitial Cystitis (IC)/Painful Bladder Syndrome (PBS) in men and women, than previously undertaken.

Patients with CP or IC are now being recruited for a new research study called the “MAPP Network Epidemiology and Phenotyping Study”!! By taking part in these studies, participants may help doctors gain a better understanding of how CP and IC affect individuals’ overall health and aid them in developing better treatments.

Like many chronic pain disorders, CP and IC are poorly understood and treatments are often not helpful. Our goal in the MAPP Network is to better understand the underlying causes of CP or IC. Through this study we also hope to better understand how CP and IC relate to other chronic pain conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia (FM), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).The MAPP Network studies are observational, which means we will ask questions and gather information about your health and life for research purposes, but we will not treat you or change any current treatments you may have for your condition. During this study, you will remain under the care of your usual physicians. The MAPP Network plans to enroll a total of 360 patients with some form of CP or IC at nine medical centers across the country, as well as a number of patients with IBS, FM, and CFS.

This is a 12 month study. After the first visit (Screening/Baseline visit), participants will be asked to come back to the clinical center twice during the next 12 months, as well as complete a brief biweekly (every other week) and bimonthly (every other month) computer questionnaires at home in between clinic visits. In addition to the clinic visits and online assessments, during the next 12 months participants will be asked to collect a maximum of 4 home urine samples to aid in our study of how symptoms change over time. Participants will also be given the option to enroll in additional network research studies that will provide new and important information for the main study.

To learn more about participating in the MAPP Network study at the below locations, check out the “Recruiting Sites” tab on the MAPP Research Network website at www.mappnetwork.org/

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
University of California, Los Angles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California




Updated Prostatitis Surgery web site at http://ProstatitisSurgery.com (March 21, 2010)

This is to let you know that we've updated the Prostatitis Surgery web site at http://ProstatitisSurgery.com

The site now includes more patient stories, including the story of a doctor and a story of a paraplegic with severe chronic prostatitis.

There are also videos from David Radford, who was 2½ years out when he recorded this interview, and from me to summarize things.

I will be pleased to answer any questions.

Thank you.
Arnon Krongrad, MD
email prostatitis@laprp.com
Telephone 305 936 0474





Research request on the Transition From Acute to Chronic Pain by NIH (March 5, 2010)


Collaborative Research on the Transition From Acute to Chronic Pain: New Models and Measures in Clinical and Preclinical Pain Research
(R01 - RFA-DE-11-001)

Release/Posted Date: February 26, 2010
Opening Date: May 24, 2010
Application Due Date(s): June 22, 2010
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): March 2011

The goal of this FOA is to stimulate preclinical and clinical research that will accelerate our understanding of the biological and behavioral determinants driving the transition from acute pain to chronic pain disorders. An understanding of the mechanisms and risk factors that determine who will transition to a chronic pain state is necessary in order to intervene in this transition and to design new, effective treatments to resolve acute pain before it becomes chronic. The objectives of this FOA are to: 1) assemble research teams with expertise in basic and clinical pain research and related expertise outside the pain field that will provide novel, collaborative, multidisciplinary approaches to answer crucial questions about the transition from acute to chronic pain; 2) discover biological and behavioral mechanisms that drive the transition from an acute pain state to a chronic dysfunctional pain condition; and 3) develop new clinical and preclinical models and measures of pain that will be essential to identify and characterize these mechanisms. Studies that involve considerable risk (but have the potential for breakthroughs in the field) are strongly encouraged.

For additional information, please visit: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-11-001.html



Urinary Catheterization of Men and Women pamphlet (March 4, 2010)


March 3, 2010 (Charleston, sc) —The National Association For Continence (NAFC) has released a new consumer educational resource, focusing on catheterization procedures and care in the United States. The Urinary Catheterization of Men and Women pamphlet is the newest addition to NAFC’s library of educational materials available to consumers seeking knowledge of management and treatment options for medical problems related to incontinence. It is also helpful as an educational supplement to nurses giving instructions to patients regarding their self-care.

This pamphlet is available for purchase at NAFC’s online store. Bulk orders from healthcare professionals are available at a discounted price by calling 1.800.BLADDER (252.3337) or e-mailing memberservices@nafc.org. Its content is posted on the organization’s Web site.


For Some Infections, Breaking Biofilms Is Best Tactic (March 4, 2010)



Mazzoli S. Biofilm and bacterial microrganisms in genitourinary infections. [Article in Italian] Infez Med. 2009 Jun;17 Suppl 1:3-9.

Infectious microorganisms sometimes form biofilms, which are almost like glues, helping the organisms to stick to tissue surfaces and making them nearly impossible to get rid of. The films play an important role in survival and spread of infection in the body because the matrix of film protects the microorganisms from attack by the immune system and antimicrobial drugs. To kill an infection with these organisms, doctors need to use antimicrobials that can penetrate the cell membrane.

Chlamydia May Hurt Male Fertility (March 3, 2010)



Mazzoli S, Cai T, Addonisio P, Bechi A, Mondaini N, Bartoletti R. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection Is Related to Poor Semen Quality in Young Prostatitis Patients. Eur Urol. 2009 May 27. [Epub ahead of print]

Does Chlamydia trachomatis infection hurt men’s fertility? That question has been debated, but now, a large study concludes it can. In this Italian study of 1,161 men with chronic bacterial prostatitis, 707 had chronic prostatitis because of common bacteria and 454 because of C. trachomatis. The men with chlamydia infection had significantly lower concentrations of sperm, a lower percentage of motile sperm, and a higher number of abnormal sperm—all indicators of lower fertility. Correlations between these indicators and the levels of anti-chlamydia antibodies and heat shock proteins (signs of cellular stress) helped confirm the relationship between chlamydial infection and poor semen quality

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE LAUNCHES MOBILE MEDLINEPLUS TO MEET THE HEALTH INFORMATION NEEDS OF AN ON-THE-GO PUBLIC (January 25, 2010)

CONTACT: Kathy Cravedi, 301-496-6308,

Wondering what the side effects are for your new prescription? Go to Mobile MedlinePlus (http://m.medlineplus.gov) while you're waiting for the pharmacist to fill your order!

Or, instantly look up the symptoms of H1N1 flu if you're at the supermarket and your child's school calls you to tell you he doesn't feel well.

The National Library of Medicine's Mobile Medline Plus builds on the NLM's MedlinePlus Internet service, which provides authoritative consumer health information to over 10 million visitors per month. These visitors access MedlinePlus (http://medlineplus.gov) from throughout the United States as well many other countries, and use desktop computers, laptops and even mobile devices to get there.

The mobile Internet audience is large and growing fast, almost doubling from February 2007 to February 2009. *************** With this in mind, NLM developed the mobile version of MedlinePlus to bring high-quality health information to users on the go.

"We know that a huge number of people are seeking good health information on the Web," noted NLM Director Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg. "What better way to reach out to them than by offering this new mobile service, which delivers trustworthy, consumer-friendly information instantly, anywhere?"

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis-Message from Dr Polacheck (January 3, 2010)

For the past 12 years, I have been studying the cause of Chronic
Prostatitis.
Symptomatic patients have come to our Center from all 50
States of the United States, as well as from the Americas, Europe,
Asia, Africa, the Pacific and Australia seeking a diagnosis (and then
treatment). In order to make a specific etiologic diagnosis, a
vigorous prostate massage was done daily for one week. The expressed
prostatic secretions (EPS) were collected and cultured for bacteria
and bacteria-like organisms.
I would like to report the results from 600 consecutive patients: over 99 percent were found to have a bacteria or a bacteria-like organism, and many patients had multiple organisms. Therefore, this disorder should be properly called: Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis.



World Congress on Controversies in Urology (December 29, 2009)

The 3rd World Congress on
Controversies in Urology (CURy)
Hilton Hotel, Athens, Greece, February 25 - 28, 2010

A comprehensive congress fully devoted to clinical debates and controversial issues in a wide spectrum of urological conditions.

For more information put URL below in your browser
http://comtecmed.com/cury/2010/Default.aspx

Sleep Apnea and Frequent Nighttime Urination (December 17, 2009)


A breakthrough study has found that sleep apnea, a common but serious sleep disorder, is the root cause of nocturia, or getting up frequently during the night to urinate.

See full article at: http://www.talkaboutsleep.com/sleep-disorders/archives/Snoring_apnea_urination.htm

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM WILL EXPLORE THE SCIENCE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (November 19, 2009)

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM WILL EXPLORE THE SCIENCE OF COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

WHAT: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) will celebrate a decade of rigorous research with NCCAM's 10th Anniversary Research Symposium: Exploring the Science of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Speakers will discuss topics including natural products, mind-body medicine, and the intersection of behavioral science and integrative medicine. They include Jeffrey I. Gordon, M.D., Claire M. Fraser-Liggett, Ph.D., Joseph P. Noel, Ph.D., Bruce R. Rosen, M.D., Ph.D., Richard J. Davidson, Ph.D., and keynote speaker Susan Folkman, Ph.D.

WHY: People have used some complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies since ancient times and often with little scientific evidence. Since its inception in 1999, NCCAM has addressed the need to examine CAM approaches through the scope of rigorous scientific research and supported more than 2,200 research projects at scientific institutions across the United States and around the world. This symposium will highlight advances in the field of CAM research.

WHEN: Tuesday, December 8, 2009, 9 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. ET

WHERE: Masur Auditorium, Building 10, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

MORE INFORMATION: This event will be videocast at . For more information, visit .

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: The event is open to the public and registration is not required.

Information related to the Urologic Diseases in America (UDA) Project, (October 29, 2009)

UDA Online is the public site for news and information related to the Urologic Diseases in America (UDA) Project, which is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The goal of UDA is to increase general understanding of the burden of urologic diseases in both human and financial terms.
Among its accomplishments, the UDA Project has created a comprehensive omnibus of information comprising the UDA Compendium. The Compendium synthesizes information from myriad national and regional sources across the public and private sectors to report on risk factors, treatment types, prevalence, and utilization trends for urologic diseases affecting men, women and children in the United States. A downloadable PDF of the Compendium's latest version is available via the "UDA Compendium" link on UDA.online.net
Another aspect of UDA is its analytical and logistic support of collaborative research projects designed by young investigators in urologic health services research. These collaborative analyses will yield a rich volume of published research that examines and expands on topics from the Compendium. A list of current collaborations is available via the link. For a complete list of UDA publications, including downloadable PDFs, click on the "Publications" link .
The project is now in its second stage, which includes the launching of UDA Online and the Interactive UDA Compendium. Here, you can use data from any of the hundreds of tables and charts available in the printed Compendium to customize a chart or graph for your own presentation or report. Try it out by going to UDAonline.net

UDA Online: Information on the Impact of Urologic Diseases (October 26, 2009)

www.udaonline.net

Description: Researchers at UCLA launched a new web site to help inform the public about the impact of urologic diseases on the American people. Part of the Urologic Diseases in America (UDA) project, UDA Online seeks to increase the general understanding of the burden of urologic diseases in both human and financial terms and includes conference presentations on UDA findings and a list of publications developed through the many collaborative analyses that the project supports. UDA is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. Public Site Features Customizable Data Charts and Information related to the NIH-sponsored Urologic Diseases in America Project at UCLA.


Urologic Diseases Dictionary Index (October 15, 2009)


This dictionary defines words that are often used when people talk or write about urologic diseases. It is designed for people who have urologic diseases and their families and friends.
The words are listed in alphabetical order. Some words have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to urologic diseases are included. Words that appear in bold italic are defined elsewhere in the dictionary. A term will refer the reader to another definition only when the second definition gives additional information about a topic that is directly related to the first term.
This information is not a substitute for a visit to your doctor. Talk to a health professional if you have a urologic problem.
See- http://www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/udictionary/index.htm

New Approaches in Pain Management (October 3, 2009)

Researchchannel.org has information about a pain webinar that should be interesting.
Go to their wewbsite for more information.

New Approaches in Pain Management
10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9
University of Washington
Pain is impossible to measure, often making it difficult for physicians to diagnose and treat. Patients seeking treatment for pain may face prejudice and distrust. But physicians at the Center for Pain Relief at the University of Washington Medical Center believe in taking a new and more comprehensive approach to treating patients with pain. The Center for Pain Relief offers specialists in psychiatry, psychology, neurology, physical rehabilitation and alternative therapies.

NIH ANNOUNCES 115 AWARDS TO ENCOURAGE HIGH-RISK RESEARCH AND INNOVATION (September 24, 2009)

Subj:

Date: 9/24/2009 10:43:05 AM Central Daylight Time
From: olib@OD.NIH.GOV

To: NIHPRESS@LIST.NIH.GOV

Sent from the Internet (Details)




U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
NIH Office of the Director (OD)
For Immediate Release: Thursday, September 24, 2009

CONTACT: NIH Office of Communications, 301-496-5787, nihnmb@mail.nih.gov

NIH ANNOUNCES 115 AWARDS TO ENCOURAGE HIGH-RISK RESEARCH AND INNOVATION
Recovery Act Funds Contribute To Increase

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that it is awarding $348 million to encourage investigators to explore bold ideas that have the potential to catapult fields forward and speed the translation of research into improved health.

The full complement of awards is granted under three innovative research programs supported by the NIH Common Fund's Roadmap for Medical Research: the NIH Director's Transformative R01 (T-R01) Awards, Pioneer Awards, and New Innovator Awards. The Common Fund, enacted into law by Congress through the 2006 NIH Reform Act, supports cross-cutting, trans-NIH programs with a particular emphasis on innovation and risk taking. A portion of these New Innovator Awards is also supported by funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

"The appeal of the Pioneer, New Innovator, and now the T-R01 programs, is that investigators are encouraged to challenge the status quo with innovative ideas, while being given the necessary resources to test them," said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. "The fact that we continue to receive such strong proposals for funding through the programs reflects the wealth of creative ideas in science today."

Accelerating the current pace of discovery through the support of highly innovative research is an ongoing effort at the NIH, but the NIH Director's T-R01 Program is new this year. Named for the standard investigator-initiated research project that the NIH supports, the R01, the T-R01s provide a new opportunity for scientists that is unmatched by any other NIH program. Since no budget cap is imposed and preliminary results are not required, scientists are free to propose new, bold ideas that may require significant resources to pursue. They are also given the flexibility to work in large, complex teams if the complexity of the research problem demands it.

This year, the NIH is granting 115 NIH Director's High-Risk Research Awards: 42 T-R01 Awards, 18 Pioneer Awards, and 55 New Innovator Awards for early-stage investigators.

The NIH expects to make competing awards of $30 million to T-R01 awardees, $13.5 million to Pioneer awardees, and approximately $131 million to New Innovators in Fiscal Year 2009. The total funding provided to this competing cohort over a five-year period is estimated to be $348 million. The New Innovator total includes $23 million in funds through the Recovery Act.

This year's awards make the largest number of Pioneer and New Innovator awards in the programs' history. Investigators funded via the 2004 cohort, the first year of the Pioneer Awards, have completed their projects. Details on the progress made by these awardees are available at
The 2009 recipients' names and institutions are listed below.

More information on the Transformative R01 Award is at . For descriptions of the 2009 recipients' research plans, see .

Information on the Pioneer Award is at , including information on this year's awardees
More information on the New Innovator Award is at . For descriptions of the 2009 recipients' research plans, see .


The NIH Common Fund encourages collaboration and supports a series of exceptionally high impact, trans-NIH programs known collectively as the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. The NIH Director's Transformative R01, Pioneer, and New Innovator Award programs are part of the NIH Roadmap. They are funded through the Common Fund and managed by the NIH Office of the Director and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, respectively. The Roadmap is a series of initiatives designed to pursue major opportunities and gaps in biomedical research that no single NIH institute could tackle alone, but that the agency as a whole can address to make the biggest impact possible on the progress of medical research. Additional information about the NIH Roadmap can be found at .

The Office of the Director, the central office at NIH, is responsible for setting policy for NIH, which includes 27 Institutes and Centers. This involves planning, managing, and coordinating the programs and activities of all NIH components. The Office of the Director also includes program offices which are responsible for stimulating specific areas of research throughout NIH. Additional information is available at .

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .
--------------------------------------
Some activities described in this release are being funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). More information about NIH's ARRA grant funding opportunities can be found at http://grants.nih.gov/recovery/. To track the progress of HHS activities funded through the ARRA, visit www.hhs.gov/recovery. To track all federal funds provided through the ARRA, visit www.recovery.gov.

## Abbreviated by Prostatitis Foundation for space limitations. List of 2009 recipients deleted.

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Whats really in your supplements? (September 10, 2009)

The Wall Street Journal carried an excellent article in the Sept 8th edition about dangerous ingredients in herbal remedies. It was in the B Section called Personal Journal. Everyone should check out any food supplement they are taking and inform their doctor. There can be problems when taking some of them alone or of conflicts with other prescription medicines they are taking. The WSJ listed http://www.dietary- supplements.info..nih.gov, http://nccam.nih.gov and other sites for more information.

Dr. Lee Nyberg, NIDDK Urology Director, Retiring in September 2009 (September 10, 2009)


Leroy M. Nyberg, MD, PhD, Urology Director, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) is retiring.
Dr. Nyberg helped the Prostatitis Foundation from their the very start in 1995. We are grateful for his generous support and assistance.

Disease Information Family History (2 wesites) (September 3, 2009)

http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home.html
Disease Information A to Z

Individuals interested in recording their family's health history can visit http://www.hhs.gov/familyhistory a tool provided by the Office of the Surgeon General.

Doctor Nyberg Retires (September 3, 2009)

Copied from the ICA Newsletter

Dr. Lee Nyberg, NIDDK Urology Director, Retiring in September 2009
Leroy M. Nyberg, MD, PhD, Urology Director, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) is retiring. As the ICA's liaison to the NIDDK for the past 20 years, Dr. Nyberg helped us better understand the inner workings of NIH and kept us apprised of NIDDK research priorities. We are grateful for his generous support and assistance.

CLINICAL TRIALS THAT ADDRESS THE PROBLEM OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE (September 2, 2009)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, September 2, 2009

CONTACT: NIAID Office of Communications, 301-402-1663, niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov>

NIAID FUNDS CLINICAL TRIALS THAT ADDRESS THE PROBLEM OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

Scientists are addressing the threat of antimicrobial drug resistance by launching two new clinical trials aimed at prolonging the effectiveness of currently available antibacterial drugs. The concept underlying both studies: Less is more.

The six-year contracts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, are part of an initiative intended to help answer key questions about proper antimicrobial doses, treatment duration and whether antimicrobial treatment is necessary in all cases. NIAID has made an initial award of $1.5 million to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with further funding of up to a total of $13.8 million available over the six-year course of the contract if clinical trial milestones are met. Duke University, Durham, N.C., has received an initial award of $1.4 million. If milestones are met, the total award from NIAID to the Duke team could total up to $11 million over six years.

Many infectious diseases are increasingly difficult to treat because bacteria and other microbes have developed resistance to commonly used antimicrobial drugs. Microbial drug resistance is driven by a variety of forces, including expanded use of antimicrobial drugs in human and animal healthcare. According to one estimate, between 5 and 10 percent of all hospitalized patients in the United States develop a drug-resistant infection of some kind, leading to an added $5 billion in annual healthcare costs.

"The clinical trials supported by this important initiative will provide vital information on the optimal use of antimicrobial drugs in a variety of clinical settings," says NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "This information is critical to improving patient care and slowing the development of drug resistance."

Reducing the risk of antimicrobial resistance is a priority for NIAID, as exemplified by these new trials and two similar studies now under way. NIAID also intends to fund additional innovative proposals aimed at slowing the development of antimicrobial resistance through targeted clinical trials.

"Historically, development of new antimicrobials has moved at a much slower pace than the evolution of resistance to those treatments, so we need to look at preserving the usefulness of the drugs we have," says Dennis M. Dixon, Ph.D., chief of the Bacteriology and Mycology Branch within NIAID's Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. "One way to reduce the risk of resistance, and therefore to preserve antimicrobials, is to reduce unnecessary use of these drugs."

In the new round of research, investigators at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will study children with urinary tract infections to determine if treatment with antimicrobials can be shortened from the standard length of up to two weeks and still be effective. The study will enroll as many as 1,000 children.

The Duke study also will test the effectiveness of shorter duration of antimicrobial treatment. This project will focus on hospitalized patients who acquire staphylococcal infections in the bloodstream after use of an intravenous catheter. This study could lead to reduced drug exposure in patients with such infections, which in turn lowers the chance that bacteria will develop resistance to the drugs. The conditions studied in these trials-infections in the urinary tract or the bloodstream-are ones where development of antimicrobial resistance is of particular concern.

Christine Chiou, M.D., is the NIAID program officer overseeing the projects at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and at Duke. The projects are part of a second round of funding to support research on optimal ways to treat bacterial infections while minimizing development of antimicrobial resistance. The first awards were made in 2007 to the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Francisco .

NIAID is soliciting additional proposals for new projects to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance, including ones focused on acute ear infections in children, pneumonia and bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. For more information about this new research initiative, Targeted Clinical Trials to Reduce the Risk of Antimicrobial Resistance, see .

To learn more about NIAID research on antimicrobial resistance, visit .

NIAID conducts and supports research-at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide-to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at .

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .

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This NIH News Release is available online at:
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Understanding Clinical Trials (July 27, 2009)

* Understanding Clinical Trials at http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/info/understand


* Are Clinical Studies for You? at http://www.cc.nih.gov/participate/studies.shtml

Recovery Act Funding Supports 23 Fellowships (July 23, 2009)

RECOVERY ACT FUNDING SUPPORTS 23 FELLOWSHIPS FOR EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS

Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will allow the National Institutes of Health to create jobs for early career scientists and increase the ranks of researchers and clinicians working in the global health field. With $3 million in funding over the next 18 months, the NIH's Fogarty International Center will be able to support 23 additional participants in its Clinical Research Training Scholars and Fellows Program.


This NIH News Release is available online at:
.

A warning for your consideration (July 21, 2009)

A paragraph in this testimony, written several years ago, caught our eye at the Prostatitis Foundation and we pass it on to you as a warning or caution:
Following standard advice for maintaining prostate health, I ate, for months, large servings of broccoli, spinach, cauliflower, sauerkraut, vitamins and minerals. But suddenly I found myself in a hospital with a deep venal thrombosis in my right leg. According to the byback paper in the Marcumar blood thinner pills that I have to swallow now, these green vegetables contain much Vitamin K, which creates blood clotting. Besides too much vegetable food turns my urine alkaline which promotes growth of bacteria. Nobody warned me of this before

This newsletter and information is provided as a public service by the Prostatitis Foundation. The Foundation does not endorse or assume any liability for any doctor, medicine or treatment protocol. Always work in consultation with your own doctor.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) (July 21, 2009)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) -- The Nation's Medical Research Agency -- includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit .

Information on Clinical Trial (July 10, 2009)

The company forming the clinical trial just listed at the left hand top corner of the Prostatitis.org homepage has added this video to the recruitment information.

See a recruitment video posted to You tube with the information regarding our clinical trial?
Here is the link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBq1bGxsOgU

Prostatitis Foundation Disclaimer Policy (July 10, 2009)

All newsletters and all information on this website is provided as a public service by the Prostatitis Foundation. The Foundation does not endorse or assume any liability for any doctor, medicine or treatment protocol. Always work in consultation with your own doctor.
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Regarding the MAPP Research Network. (March 26, 2009)

The MAPP Network web site is now public (www.Mappnetwork.org
Please study this web site and follow it for additional information.

The NIH is making an effort to seek a cause and cure for prostatitis in response to your requests and letters so we need to support these research centers when the time comes.

Prostatitis Foundation


To Members of Medical-Scientific Community, (March 6, 2009)


The NIH announced the allocation of $200 million to support hundreds of 2-year, $1 million challenge grants: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-003.html. This new program will support research on 'high priority challenge topics' that would benefit from significant 2-year jumpstart funds. The complete list can be viewed online: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/challenge_award/High_Priority_Topics.pdf#topic_01

The earliest date an application may be submitted to grants.gov is March 27, 2009. Applications are due on April 27, 2009. Peer review will take place over the summer and grants will be announced in the fall. Eligible US organizations/institutions are listed in the request for applications.

We encourage you to contact the program officer(s) listed under each topic area for additional information and to discuss potential projects.

"Prostatitis is a significant health problem, with a prevalence of 11% to 16%." (February 28, 2009)

"Prostatitis is a significant health problem, with a prevalence of 11% to 16%."
Mishra VC, Browne J, and Emberton M: Role of repeated prostatic massage in chronic prostatitis: a systematic review of the literature. Urology. 2008 Oct;72(4):731-5.

2009 AUA Annual Meeting (January 23, 2009)



The 2009 AUA Annual Meeting in Chicago is growing closer. As you plan your itinerary for the Annual Meeting, we ask that you please keep these Office of Research events in mind:

Saturday, April 25, 7:00 a.m.

Run For Urology Health, On the Go for a Cure! 5K Run/2K Walk

Grant Park, East Balbo Dr. and South Columbus Dr.

Click here to register

Sunday, April 26, 3:00 – 5:30 p.m.

Research Forum – “Showcasing Young Investigators”

McCormick Place South Rooms S102 A/B/C/D

Monday, April 27, 6:30 – 8:00 a.m.

AUA Foundation Scholars Breakfast (by invitation only)

Hyatt McCormick Chicago Hotel - Regency Ballroom A



O’Brien Research Centers

The National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is pleased to announce the release of a new program funding announcement for the George M. O’Brien Urology Research Centers. The George M. O’Brien Urology Research Centers (P50) application due date is March 18, 2009. Please be advised that, although not required, a letter of intent is strongly encouraged to be received by KUH by February 18, 2009. The RFA is available at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-08-016.html. To view this RFA as well as RFA updates and timelines, please visit the NIDDK’s “O’Brien Kidney and Urology Research Centers Updates” Web page at http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/Research/Centers/CenterPrograms/OBrien_Updates.htm. To request additional information, please contact Dr. Debuene Chang at changtd@mail.nih.gov.



Rodney Cotten, PMP
Research Programs Manager
American Urological Association Foundation
1000 Corporate Boulevard
Linthicum, MD 21090
Toll Free 1-866-RING-AUA x3750
(410) 689-3750
Fax: (410) 689-3850
rcotten@auafoundation.org

www.auafoundation.org

www.UrologyHealth.org


Promoting health through education * Empowering patients through advocacy * Advancing cures through research

Back $10 Billion for NIH in Economic Recovery Act Contact Your Senators Immediately (January 3, 2009)

Contact your senators now in support of $10 billion for the National Institutes of Health in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The full Senate will debate the bill this week, including Senator Arlen Specter's (PA) amendment to increase NIH funding.

Sen. Specter's amendment would add $6.5 billion to the $3.5 billion for NIH currently included in the bill. Additional funds provided by the amendment would be distributed to the Institutes and Centers proportional to their current funding level.

Investing in the NIH will create and sustain high-paying jobs in every state while improving the lives and health of Americans. Take action now!

The NIH has supported prostatitis research consistently. Let us assist them now by supporting this amendment backed by Senator Arlen Spector.

Please contact your senators.

COMMON TREATMENT FOR CHRONIC PROSTATITIS FAILS TO REDUCE SYMPTOMS (December 19, 2008)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH News
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Embargoed for Release: Wednesday, December 17, 2008, 5:00 p.m. EST
CONTACT: Arthur Stone, 301-496-3583,

COMMON TREATMENT FOR CHRONIC PROSTATITIS FAILS TO REDUCE SYMPTOMS

Alfuzosin, a drug commonly prescribed for men with chronic prostatitis, a painful disorder of the prostate and surrounding pelvic area, failed to significantly reduce symptoms in recently diagnosed men who had not been previously treated with this drug, according to a clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study is to be published in the "New England Journal of Medicine".

"Although these results are disappointing, it is just as important to find out what doesn't work as it is to know what does," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "We have conclusively shown that a drug commonly prescribed for men with chronic prostatitis did not significantly reduce symptoms compared to a placebo."

Ameriican Family Physician Archives (December 16, 2008)

Online access to new issues of American Family Physician is restricted to AAFP members and paid subscribers. The content of each issue is made freely available about one year after publication. The bulk of the online archives are open to all.

REVIEW OF PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION STUDY SHOWS NO BENEFIT FOR USE OF SELENIUM AND VITAMIN E SUPPLEMENTS (December 9, 2008)

Initial, independent review of study data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and other institutes that comprise the National Institutes of Health shows that selenium and vitamin E supplements, taken either alone or together, did not prevent prostate cancer. The data also showed two concerning trends: a small but not statistically significant increase in the number of prostate cancer cases among the over 35,000 men age 50 and older in the trial taking only vitamin E and a small, but not statistically significant increase in the number of cases of adult onset diabetes in men taking only selenium (10 percent for those taking selenium vs. 9.3 percent taking placebo). Neither of these findings proves an increased risk from the supplements and both may be due to chance.

The Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), an international network of research institutions, coordinates SELECT at more than 400 clinical sites in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada.

Vitamins E and Selenium taken alone or together do not prevent prostate cancer. (December 5, 2008)

Urology Times reported in the December 08 issue that the supplements Vitamins E and Selenium taken alone or together do not prevent prostate cancer. The trial was stopped.

Krongrad Institute Launches Ground Breaking Trial for Chronic Prostatitis (October 22, 2008)

Subj: Krongrad Institute Launches Ground Breaking Trial for Chronic Prostatitis
Date: 10/21/2008 11:21:07 AM Central Daylight Time

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AVENTURA, FLORIDA

Approval of Ground Breaking Clinical Trial for Chronic Prostatitis

Multidisciplinary team headed by the Krongrad Institute launches ground breaking trial of minimally invasive surgery for Chronic Prostatitis

Chronic prostatitis is associated with a cluster of potentially debilitating symptoms, including pain and bleeding upon urination and/or ejaculation, fever, malaise, and weakness. In severe cases, patients have pain from such mundane acts as sitting.

Chronic prostatitis is not only potentially ruinous at the personal level. It is also a huge public health problem estimated to cause as many as two million doctor visits a year in the United States alone.

The Krongrad Institute for Minimally Invasive Prostate Surgery has just received IRB approval to conduct a prospective, longitudinal, non-randomized, single-arm Phase II study of patients with a diagnosis of chronic prostatitis before and after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, a form of minimally invasive surgery.

"Individual clinical cases have shown that surgery using laparoscopic radical prostatectomy can eliminate the symptoms associated with chronic prostatitis. This represents a conceptual revolution for men who otherwise have no effective treatment option. The study -- the first of its kind -- aims to better characterize and quantify the effects of minimally invasive surgery on the symptoms of chronic prostatitis," said the study's principal investigator Arnon Krongrad, MD.

The study is being led by Arnon Krongrad, MD, who in 1999 pioneered the use of laparoscopic prostatectomy in the United States; Dr. Krongrad will personally perform all the surgeries. The team also includes co-investigator and statistician Shenghan Lai, MD, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology, Medicine, Pathology, and Radiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Rajiv Parti, MD, an anesthesiologist and Director of Advanced Pain Medicine at the Pain Institute of California; Dr. Parti himself had a 20-year history of chronic prostatitis, which was effectively treated by laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

To learn more and to apply for participation please log on to:
http://ProstatitisSurgery.com/ or http://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00775515

Media Inquiries: Arnon Krongrad, MD
email: ak@laprp.com
Phone: 305-936-0474

Patient Referrals: Ruth
email: ruth@laprp.com
Phone: 305-936-0474
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Dr. Krongrad recently discussed prostatitis surgery on CBN's Living the Life
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More information leads on top left column of prostatitis webpage.

New funding opportunity in pain research today. (September 11, 2008)

Pain study NIH

Dear Members of the Medical-Scientific Community,

The NIH announced an exciting new funding opportunity in pain research today. Additional information on the 'Request for Applications' can be viewed below.

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Roadmap Transformative R01 Program (R01)
RFA-RM-08-029
http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-08-029.html


Purpose
As part of the NIH Roadmap for Biomedical Research, the National Institutes of Health invites transformative Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations proposing exceptionally innovative, high risk, original and/or unconventional research with the potential to create new or challenge existing scientific paradigms. Projects must clearly demonstrate potential to produce a major impact in a broad area of biomedical or behavioral research.

Mechanism of Support
This FOA will utilize the NIH Research Project Grant (R01) award mechanism.

Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards
The NIH common fund intends to commit $25 million dollars in FY 2009 to fund up to 60 applications submitted in response to this FOA.

Budget and Project Period
Budget requests should be commensurate with project needs up to a five-year project period. There is no budget limit per proposal up to the budget cap for the program as a whole.

One area of highlighted need in the RFA is:
"Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain"

More than 30 million Americans suffer from unrelieved chronic pain. Management strategies often fail, in part because an individual's susceptibility to chronic pain is highly variable, the identification of those destined to transition from acute to chronic pain is difficult, and, once pain has become chronic, changes may have occurred that cannot be easily reversed. The lack of well defined phenotypes that reflect the cellular, molecular, genetic, psychological, cognitive, and behavioral changes that occur as individuals transition to chronic pain has been a major barrier to development of personalized approaches to pain intervention. For these reasons, T-R01 proposals are sought that will transform how we view the pain state of individuals and that will revolutionize the current empirically-based analgesic treatment approaches to ones based upon objective and predictive measures of an individual's pain phenotype. It is anticipated that responsive studies will involve formation of innovative partnerships including interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams to adequately address the topic and experimental aims.


Copied with permission of NVA (National Vulvadenia Association)

NEW RESEARCH PLANS (September 5, 2008)

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), one of the National Institutes of Health, announced today that $37.5 million new dollars will be dedicated to a 5-year initiative examining urologic chronic pelvic pain disorders, namely IC and chronic prostatitis in men.

For more information about the MAPP initiative, please visit the NIDDK's website: http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2008/ niddk-05.htm



Prostatitis Information (August 14, 2008)

THE National Cancer Institute at the National Institute of Health has a free brochure called: Understanding Prostate Changes. They describe among other things:
Prostate changes that occur with age
Prostatitis and BPH
Key questions to ask the doctor
Types of Tests
You can order one at 800 422 6237 or online at WWW.cancer.gov Click on NCI Publications

More on biofilm; possibly involved in Urinary Tract Infection? (August 4, 2008)

Go to Washingtonpost.com to see an interesting illustrated article about the social lives of biofilm. In the lookup options go to science. It is written by David Brown a staff writer in collaboration with Carsten Matz a microbiologist in Brunswick, Germany. It builds upon an article in Public Library of Science PLOS One. The discussion is about the ability of bacteria reacting to each other and their ability to form biofilms or toxins in reaction to one another.

New Research Plans at NIH (July 25, 2008)





National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For Immediate Release
Friday July 25, 2008

E-mail this page
Subscribe Contact:
Arthur Stone
301-496-3583


NIDDK Publishes a Strategic Plan for Research into Benign Prostate Disease


For the first time, a strategic plan for research into benign prostate disease, based on the latest scientific knowledge, has been published by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIDDK Prostate Research Strategic Plan is the culmination of discussions and meetings among experts over the past two years in an effort to outline a strategic vision for research into these elusive and multi-faceted diseases.

"The NIDDK Prostate Research Strategic Plan reflects NIH’s commitment to advancing translational research by facilitating planning efforts among basic scientists, clinicians, advocacy groups, and patients," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "The educational summaries in each section of the plan provide clear explanations of the scientific data and the reasoning behind each of the recommended research priorities."

The research area of benign prostate disease includes two of the most significant non-cancerous disorders affecting males — benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). BPH, an enlargement of the prostate gland, is often associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). LUTS, which can include symptoms such as overactive bladder, restricted or excessive urination, and sensations of urgency, affects men of all races and ethnic groups and can become severe over time. An estimated 50 percent of men in their 50s have BPH and 26 to 46 percent of men between the ages of 40 and 79 have moderate to severe symptoms. CP/CPPS is generally described as inflammation of the prostate gland. There is no detectable bacterial basis, but CP/CPPS sometimes is associated with urinary symptoms, pain, and sexual dysfunction. The source of the pain in this syndrome is unknown and there are no generally effective methods for preventing or treating the condition.

The NIDDK Prostate Research Strategic Plan addresses the four major research areas judged critical for advancing the field. These include basic science, epidemiology and population-based studies, translational research, and clinical sciences. Recommendations from the plan include:

Promote interdisciplinary research that focuses on how benign prostate diseases are influenced by other organ-specific diseases and systemic conditions, such as obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and erectile dysfunction. For example, the possible influence of high blood pressure on BPH/LUTS is a previously unexplored area of research.
Study the primary prevention of benign prostate diseases, including possible benefits of lifestyle changes such as avoidance of alcohol and caffeine, frequency of sexual practice, pelvic massage therapy, stress reduction, and diet modulation for relief of CP/CPPS.
Develop data and human tissue resources from patients of various ages to derive information useful in investigating risk factors, underlying causes and natural history of disease progression, quality of life, quality of care, and decision making regarding treatment of benign prostate disease. Develop imaging approaches and other biomarker studies to assess severity and risk of progression based on physical and cellular findings.
Develop targeted medical therapies based on new insights into disease-relevant cellular pathways and physiological events.
Develop standardized, clinically significant benign prostate disease syndrome definitions and classifications based on measurable phenotypic features.
Train and mentor epidemiologists, health services researchers, clinical investigators, and students interested in the study of benign prostate disease.
"The long-standing, unanswered questions about the causes of these disorders prompted the NIDDK to examine the state of the science and to develop a new vision for future research," explained Chris Mullins, Ph.D., NIDDK’s director of basic cell biology programs in urologic and kidney disease. "As part of this process we convened the Prostate Research Planning Committee, composed of clinical and basic scientists and epidemiologists from around the country, to review and evaluate past and current research and to make individual recommendations for new research priorities. The NIDDK Prostate Research Strategic Plan is the result of that collaborative effort."

The plan is designed to be read by a broad audience of researchers, clinicians, advocacy groups, representatives of funding organizations, and patients. Each major section includes a mission statement, a lay summary, an overview of current knowledge, and high-priority recommendations for future research. The plan is online at http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/NR/rdonlyres/318606D2-A9D1-4CAD-B9BF-8EB3009C83BE/0/NIDDKProstateStrategicPlan.pdf and can be purchased online in print or compact disc format at http://catalog.niddk.nih.gov/PubType.cfm?Type=182&CH=NKUDIC.

NIDDK conducts and supports research in diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases. Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe, and disabling conditions affecting Americans. For more information about NIDDK and its programs, see www.niddk.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.


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CP/CPPS and Prostate Cancer Don’t Share Genetic Variation (July 16, 2008)


CP/CPPS and Prostate Cancer Don’t Share Genetic Variation

Do androgen receptor polymorphisms contribute to an increased risk for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and prostate cancer (CaP)?

Ki Hak Song, Seattle, WA, Donald E Riley, Teresa L Gilbert, In Rae Cho, Ilsan, Republic of Korea, Young Seop Chang, Daejeon, Republic of Korea, John N Krieger, Seattle, WA

Because male hormones (androgens) influence prostate growth and because inflammation may be implicated in cancer development, these researchers looked at whether some genetic variation related to androgens might predispose men to chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), prostate cancer, or both. They looked short tandem repeats (STRs) at the androgen receptor gene in 63 CP/CPPS patients, 88 prostate cancer patients, and 72 control men. STRs are short repeats of DNA that help identify variations in a gene. CP/CPPS patients and prostate cancer patients had distinct and typical variations at the androgen receptor that were different from controls but also different from each other. Some change in the androgen receptor, concluded the researchers, might predispose a man to one condition or the other, but the specific variations and the disease mechanisms likely differ.

Exploratory/Developmental Research Project: Immune Defense Mechanisms at the Mucosa (July 11, 2008)



Immune Defense Mechanisms at the Mucosa

RFA Number: RFA-AI-08-020 Grant Type: R21

Letters of Intent Receipt Date: September 15, 2008

Application Receipt Date: October 15, 2008

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AI-08-020.html

Description: The National Institutes of Health has released a new Request for Applications (RFA) pertaining to mechanisms of mucosal immune defense. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) invites Exploratory/Developmental Research Project (R21) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to study immune defense mechanisms and immune regulation at mucosal surfaces including the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urogenital tracts. The goal is to gain new insights that will facilitate future development of vaccines and immunotherapies to protect mucosal surfaces from infection and inflammation. Investigators who have no prior history of receiving independent funding in this field are encouraged to apply. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will support basic and applied research that contributes to understanding broadly applicable host mechanisms of mucosal immune defense.



PSA and biopsies (June 26, 2008)

In the June 2007 issue of the AARP Bulletin on page 14 they discuss a new test for prostate cancer. In the column Your Health they state, “Each year about 1.6 million men with high PSA levels have biopsies; some 80 percent turn out to be cancer-free.”

Comment by prostatitis Foundation---- A good deal of the false-positives were probably caused by prostatitis.

Research Funding Figures (June 26, 2008)

In the June 2007 issue of the AARP Bulletin on page 12 they estimate these figures for 2007 research funding.

Cancer 5.50 billion
HIV/AIDS 2.90 billion
Cardiovascular 2.34 billion
Alzheimers 643 million

Write your representatives to ask for more prostatitis research funding.

Male Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome study (June 10, 2008)

Male Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome study. Do you experience pain in the genital or pelvic region?
McGill University Health Center and the Department of Urology at the Jewish General Hospital are seeking men over the age of 18 who experience pain in the genital or pelvic region to participate in research to better explain this problem.

The study involves answering questionnaires and a session which will last around 1.5 to 2 hours.
Participation during the session includes:
1. a structured interview;
2. a sensory testing session;
3. a urology examination;
4. urine samples.
Some minor pain may be experienced during the procedures, but no other health risks are posed. Participants will be reimbursed $50 for their expenses. For more information, please call Seth Davis at (514) 398-5323 or email: seth.davis@mail.mcgill.ca
This study is directed by Dr. Y. M. Binik, Department of Psychology, McGill University, Sex and Couple Therapy Service, McGill University Health Center (Royal Victoria Hospital).

NIDDK Meeting – “Defining the Chronic Urologic Pain Syndromes - International Symposium” (June 9, 2008)

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) will host a symposium, “Defining the Chronic Urologic Pain Syndromes - International Symposium” on June 16-17, 2008 at the Doubletree Hotel in Bethesda, Md. The purpose of the symposium is to enlist expert opinion related to the multiplicity of factors involved in defining the urologic pelvic pain syndromes and explore the pros and cons of developing a unifying definition. The meeting will be informative for clinicians, basic scientists, patients, advocacy groups, pharmaceutical representatives, and the public interested in developing a further understanding of the urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes and the associated disorders. A major outcome will be development of a definition of these diseases, and their phenotypes which will be used in future NIDDK funded research studies.
The meeting is open to all, however pre-registration is essential because of seating limitations. For more information on the meeting, including the program agenda , go to http://www3.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/UrologicPainSynd/index.htm.

Contact Maria Smith at (301) 670-4990 or by e-mail at MSmith@scgcorp.com.

Diet and Prostatits (May 26, 2008)

In an issue of The Louisiana Weekly there was an article written by Fr, Jerome Ledoux a contributing columnist dated March 3, 2008. He made this observation in a lengthy article, “A watermark life-altering experience happened on April 30, 1996 when, after seven months of delay I finally listened to a recorded dietary talk of Rev. George Malkmus. I was so stricken by the healings that I dropped all meats, all seafoods, all dairy products.”

He begins the next paragraph by saying, “My 8-year bout with prostatitis was over in three weeks.”

Quercetin for Prostatitis (May 26, 2008)

The Seattle Times carried a question and answer column in the Sunday March 2, 2008 issue written by Dr. Astrid Pujari a Seattle M.D with an additional degree as a medical herbalist. In a question and answer column about the possible use of Quercetin for spring allergies Dr Pujari made the comment, “For instance, quercetin has been shown in a preliminary, well-designed trial to be helpful for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in which men have chronic pain in the area around the prostate.”

She notes that,” Quercetin may interact with some antibiotics, like those in the ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin family. And although it’s rare, some people get headaches or tingling in their hands and feet when they take it.

Prostatitis and Bicycling? (April 26, 2008)

In a syndicated column by Dr Gott that appeared March 8th a reader wrote in to say.” Many months ago, my father developed pain in the prostate area after bike riding.”

We often hear this complaint from prostatitis patients and want to caution people about using a proper seat. Another infertility specialist has written an abstract saying, "thin hard bicycle seats sometimes cause low sperm counts."

Dr Gott’s reply began by saying.” As a former bike rider, I can assure you that, at times, this activity can cause troublesome problems.”

RE: New Investigator’s Award (February 17, 2008)



We would like to remind you of the New Investigator’s Award offered to new investigators to present their work at the SIIU poster session on May 18, 2008. The first place award will cover up to $1500 for travel expenses etc, and we hope to award second and third place prizes as well.

These awards will be announced at this year’s SIIU meeting in Orlando, so if you know of any new investigators that would like to attend, please have them submit an abstract for the poster. Please indicate upon submission that the abstract is in competition for the awards.

All abstracts should be submitted to Joe Downey at downeyj@queensu.ca (phone 613 548-7832 FAX 613 548-7834).

Please note that the society voted to allow AUA posters, submitted by New Investigator’s to be eligible for consideration for SIIU award if the poster fits the “infection and inflammation” profile of the society.

FROM: Daniel Shoskes, MD President, SIIU
John Forrest, MD Vice-President, SIIU
Robert Moldwin, MD Secretary, SIIU
Michel Pontari, MD Treasurer, SIIU


-All in your head? Better get tested for anaerobic bacteria (February 7, 2008)

Ever since an insufficiently treated acute urethral infection roughly 11 years ago (windsurfing...), I have been suffering from constant pain in my prostate, painful ejaculation, sometimes whitish discharges while urinating, a general feeling of illness and fatigue.

Throughout those 11 years, I was being told time and again by several doctors that it was all in my head, that I should simply stop thinking about it etc. At some point, I had actually come to consider that a possibility.
Until a few weeks ago, when after several weeks of experiencing a slight pain in my testicles while voiding and having painfully swollen lymph nodes, I went to see a urologist for what I believed to be a bladder infection or epididymitis -
When I mentioned suffering from chronic prostatitis as well, that urologist fortunately suggested testing for anaerobic bacteria. At that point, after countless tests yielding no results, I did not seriously expect her to find anything. And yet - she did. "Urethral urine" (what comes out first) was negative. So was "bladder urine". But after a (fairly unpleasant)transrectal prostate massage, another urine test finally showed the presence of anaerobic bacteria. That fact is important - because I clearly did not have a "new" acute prostate infection, for in that case a urethral infection should have been present as well, showing in all urine probes, which obviously is not the case.
Need I say I wish somebody had done that eleven years ago?

The bottom line is: No matter how many tests do not yield anything, keep doing them, especially when symptoms are strong, and ask your doctor to screen for anaerobiae as well. And if you just know you're suffering from prostatitis and they tell you it's all in your head, changing your doctor may be a better idea than changing your mind.

SUNA's (Society for Urologic Nurses and Associates): Patient Information Resource Center (January 10, 2008)

Don’t forget our Patient Information Resource Center, the go to place for patient education. Tell your patients to go to suna.org and click the For Patients tab, or just go to suna.org/patients for access to all of our patient fact sheets. Some of the fact sheets are also available in Spanish.

Prostatitis Foundation comment: See fact sheet about prostatitis

NIH Roadmap Effort to USE Genomic Technologies To Explore Role of Microbe IN Human Health and Disease (December 20, 2007)



NIH Office of the Director (OD)

NIH Office of Portfolio Analysis
and Strategic Initiatives (OPASI)

National Human Genome
Research Institute (NHGRI)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


For Immediate Release
Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Contacts:
Geoff Spencer, NHGRI
301-402-0911

NIH Launches Human Microbiome Project
NIH Roadmap Effort to Use Genomic Technologies To Explore Role of Microbes in Human Health and Disease
The human body contains trillions of microorganisms, living together with human cells, usually in harmony. Because of their small size, however, microorganisms make up only about one to two percent of the body's mass. Many microbes maintain our health, while others cause illness. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the role this astounding assortment of bacteria, fungi and other microbes play in human health and disease. To better understand these interactions, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today announced the official launch of the Human Microbiome Project. The human microbiome is the collective genomes of all microorganisms present in or on the human body.

"The human microbiome is largely unexplored," said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D. "It is essential that we understand how microorganisms interact with the human body to affect health and disease. This project has the potential to transform the ways we understand human health and prevent, diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions."

Part of the NIH's Roadmap for Medical Research, the Human Microbiome Project will award a total of $115 million to researchers over the next five years. Initially, researchers will sequence 600 microbial genomes, completing a collection that will total some 1,000 microbial genomes and providing a resource for investigators interested in exploring the human microbiome. Other microbial genomes are being contributed to the collection by individual NIH institutes and internationally funded projects. A meeting between international partners was recently convened to discuss forming an international consortium.

Researchers will then use new, comprehensive laboratory technologies to characterize the microbial communities present in samples taken from healthy human volunteers, even for microbes that cannot be grown in the laboratory. The samples will be collected from five body regions known to be inhabited by microbial communities: the digestive tract, the mouth, the skin, the nose, and the female urogenital tract. Demonstration projects will subsequently be funded to sample the microbiomes from volunteers with specific diseases. This will allow researchers to correlate the relationship between changes in a microbiome present at a particular body site to a specific illness.

"We now understand that there are more microbial cells than human cells in the human body. The Human Microbiome Project offers an opportunity to transform our understanding of the relationships between microbes and humans in health and disease," said Dr. Alan Krensky, the director of the Office of Portfolio Analysis and Strategic Initiatives (OPASI), which oversees the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.

While the term "microbiome" may be relatively new in biomedical research, most people are familiar with some of the effects — both good and bad — that microbes can have on our health. Consider the example of the biggest reservoir of microbes in humans: the digestive tract. The human gut harbors many beneficial microorganisms, including certain bacteria called probiotics. There is evidence these probiotics, found in dietary supplements, yogurt and other dairy products as well as various soy products, can stimulate the immune system and improve digestive functions. In contrast, previous research suggests that variations in the composition of microbial communities may contribute to chronic health conditions, including diabetes, asthma, obesity and digestive disorders.

"Microbes play a significant role in the health of the digestive tract and many digestive diseases result when the microbial environment is out of balance," said Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., M.A.C.P., director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and co-chair of the Human Microbiome Project's Implementation Group. "The Human Microbiome Project will help us better understand the microbial environment in the gut, as well as provide us with the tools and technology to expand our exploration into this field of research."

Traditionally, microbiology has focused on the study of individual species as isolated units, making it difficult to develop and inventory all of the microbes in and on the human body. Because their growth is dependent upon a specific natural environment, it's difficult to recreate microbe-host interactions in the laboratory. Advances in next generation DNA sequencing technologies relying on a process called metagenomic sequencing will be used. Instead of isolating each microbe, all of the DNA within the collected samples will be sequenced.

"Our goal is to discover what microbial communities exist in different parts of the human body and to explore how these communities change in the presence of health or disease," said National Human Genome Research Institute Director, Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., co-chair of the Human Microbiome Project Implementation Group. "In addition, we will likely identify novel genes and functional elements in microbial genomes that will reshape the way we think about and approach human biology."

NIH recently awarded $8.2 million to four sequencing centers, to start building a framework and data resources for the Human Microbiome Project. One-year awards were given to the sequencing centers at the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, which are part of the NHGRI Large-Scale Sequencing Research Network; and the Broad Institute of MIT/ Harvard, Cambridge, Mass., and the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Md., which are funded through the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Microbial Genome Sequencing Centers Program.

The objectives of this initial work are to sequence the genomes of 200 microbes that have been isolated from the human body as part of the 1,000 microbial genomes collection. Researchers will also begin recruiting healthy volunteers who will donate samples from the five body regions. NHGRI, NIAID, and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) have led the initial phases of the project.

"The recent emergence of faster and cost-effective sequencing technologies promises to provide an unprecedented amount of information about these microbial communities, which in turn will bolster the development and refinement of analytical tools and strategies," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., co-chair of the Human Microbiome Project's Implementation Group.

Following the precedents set by other large-scale genomics efforts, such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project, data from the Human Microbiome Project will be swiftly deposited in public databases, including those supported by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mapview/), part of the National Library of Medicine. The project also will fund the establishment of a Data Analysis and Coordinating Center, which will coordinate data access and develop data retrieval tools for the research community.

Also following on the lead of those efforts, the Human Microbiome Project will monitor and support research on the ethical, legal and social implications of the research. Areas of focus include the clinical and health implications of using probiotics, potential forensic uses of microbiome profiles, bioterrorism and biodefense applications, the application of new technologies from the project, and patenting and privacy issues.

"Examining and addressing the emerging ethical, legal and social implications of metagenomics research is central to our goal of one day moving any resulting diagnostic, prevention, or treatment tools into the clinic in a safe and effective manner," said NIDCR Director Lawrence Tabak, D.D.S., Ph.D., co-chair for the NIH Human Microbiome Project Implementation Group.

Additional information about the Human Microbiome Project is available at http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/. For more information about funding opportunities, go to: http://www.nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/grants.asp. A high resolution image of the bacteria, Entercoccus faecalis, a microbe that lives in the human gut, is available in color at http://www.genome.gov/pressDisplay.cfm?photoID=20023, or in black and white at http://www.genome.gov/pressDisplay.cfm?photoID=20024.

The Human Microbiome Project is part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. The Roadmap is a series of initiatives designed to pursue major opportunities and gaps in biomedical research that no single NIH institute could tackle alone, but which the agency as a whole can address to make the biggest impact possible on the progress of medical research. Additional information about the NIH Roadmap can be found at www.nihroadmap.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contacts:

Karen Silver, NIH OPASI
301-435-2435

NIH Office of Communications
301-496-4461

NIAID News Office
301-402-1663

Bob Kuska, NIDCR
301-594-7560

Marcia Vital, NIDDK
301-496-3583
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
. This could be an important effort to shed some light on prostatitis.
Unfortunately the prostatitis issue among males is not directly addressed. We should point that out to the proper contacts. Starting with Griffin Rogers.

Support Group Meeting-NY Area (November 14, 2007)

At the request of several patients the Prostatitis Foundation is helping form a support group for prostatitis patients in the NY.Area. It will be held at the Comfort Inn and Suites, 20 Saw Mill River Road, Hawthorne NY 10532 for Saturday, December 1st between one and five o'clock in the afternoon. If you or anyone you know suffers from prostatitis we would like to encourage you to participate in this meeting. This will be a chance to share your experiences with other patients and compare the results of different procedures. Dr. Nyberg from the National Institute of Health will come to speak. He has helped guide this research from the very beginning.

If you're interested in attending this meeting send a letter to Prostatitis Foundation at 1063 30th Street, Smithshire, IL, 61478 or an email to Mcapstone@aol.com .

There are two patients in the areas that will be assisting with the meeting.

Ask For More Research (November 14, 2007)

Unpaid volunteers for the past 11 years have operated the Prostatitis Foundation, a nonprofit advocacy group. We have tried to raise public awareness about the prevalence of prostatitis. We have worked with the National Institute of Health and encouraged them to allocate more funding for prostatitis research.

We are asking you, to also write these two officials and ask for more research funding. It is urgent each of you and your family members join the campaign now. Email will be acceptable. Send an email to RogersG@mail.nih.gov (Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D., M.A.C.P) Director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Also to Robert Star, M.D., Acting Director - Division of Kidney, Urology and Hematology, NIDDK. His Email address is StarR@mail.nih.gov.
Tell them how you have suffered, how it affected your family and lifestyle, ask them to finish the research to find a cause and cure for prostatitis. Let them know how many patients are depending on them.


To keep from having a surge of emails and then no action we should spread them out. Please , will those whose last name begins with the first part of the alphabet (A through L) write in November and the last part (M through Z) of the alphabet write in December.

More Information about Prostatitis (November 11, 2007)

For some really great information about prostatitis go to http://www.health.harvard.edu/
In the search box type in prostatitis. There are 18 articles listed there,with their links,that contain some information about prostatitis

Article About Prostatitis (October 30, 2007)

If you go to this URL below you will find an interesting article about prostatitis
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/276526/living_with_prostatitis_disease.html

Chronic Prostatitis (September 26, 2007)


IN the April 30-May 1st Edition of the AUA Daily News, circulated at the 2003 AUA Annual Meeting Dr.Anthony Schaffer is quoted as having said in regard to Chronic Prostatitis; " Leukocyte and bacterial counts do not correlate with the severity of the disease."
He was summarizing the progress of the chronic prostatitis research and the article concluded with his statement, " In a case-controlled study, we learned that these patients are more likely to have a history of cardiovascular, psychiatric, neurologic, or sinusitis conditions."

NIH Seeks New Reaserch for Prostatitis/CPPS (September 21, 2007)

The RFA, Multi-disciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network (RFA-DK-07-003) is now published on the NIH website (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-07-003.html).

The NIDDK funding commitment for this program is up to $7.5 million per year for a five year funding period. We expect to fund up to six Discovery Sites at $1,000,000 Total Costs each year, as well as a separately funded Data Coordinating/Administrative Core and a Tissue Analysis and Technology Core (each to be supported at $750,000 in Total Costs per year).

This unique program promotes basic, translational, and clinical science interactions and multi-disciplinary, collaborative approaches using varied expertise from the urology field and from investigators not traditionally involved in chronic urologic pain research to address unmet needs in our understanding of IC/PBS and CP/CPPS. We are encouraging investigators to build strong multi-disciplinary teams to address the goals of this effort and to submit applications for this new and important NIDDK solicitation.

NOTE: The receipt date for applications is January 9, 2008.

All inquiries should be directed (preferably by Email) to either Dr. Chris Mullins (MullinsC@extra.niddk.nih.gov) or Dr. Lee Nyberg (NybergL@mail.nih.gov). Also, we have established a website for the program (see RFA text) that we will be populating with pertinent information and the NIDDK will host an in-person information session in Bethesda on November 5th, 2007.

Prostatitis.org(TM) (September 14, 2007)

Prostatitis.org(TM) The Prostatitis Foundation

On-line Webinar about Prostatitis this September 12th at 8:00 EST. (August 30, 2007)

The American Urological Association Foundation is please to be hosting a one hour interactive, on-line Webinar about Prostatitis this September 12th at 8:00 PM EST. This free program will feature Dr. Anthony Schaeffer and will have an opportunity for questions after Dr. Schaeffer's talk is completed . The recorded program will also be left on line for people who don't make it to the actual for 6 months. This link takes you directly to the description of the program. http://www.urologyhealth.org/prostateawareness/prostatitis.cfm

We are also hosting other Webinars in prostate health month and more in November for Bladder Health Week

Localized Prostate Cancer: Sept. 18, 2007 7:00 pm EST Dr. Catalona, Dr. Nadler and Dr. Zietman http://www.urologyhealth.org/prostateawareness/localizedpc.cfm

Advanced/Recurrent Prostate Cancer: Sept. 19, 2007 7:00 pm EST Dr. Moul and Dr. Kantoff http://www.urologyhealth.org/prostateawareness/recurrentpc.cfm

Enlarged Prostate/BPH: Sept. 25, 207 8:00 EST http://www.urologyhealth.org/prostateawareness/bph.cfm Dr. Roehrborn

As of next week, we will also have links on www.UrologyHealth.org for three programs in Bladder Health week!

Non-invasive Bladder Cancer: November 12 Dr. Soloway

Invasive/metastatic Bladder Cancer: November 13 Dr. Gonzalgo

Incontinence: November 14 Dr. Janelle Foote and Diane Newman


Stephanie Chisolm, Ph.D.
Director of Patient Education
American Urological Association Foundation
Phone: 410-689-4038
www.AUAFoundation.org
www.urologyhealth.org




****************************

Why does sleep apnea sometimes lead to frequent urination at night? (July 24, 2007)

Ask the Doctor:

Why does sleep apnea sometimes lead to frequent urination at night?

from the August-September 1996 issue of WAKE-UP Call. Courtesy of the
American Sleep Apnea Association

Nocturia, or nocturnal urination, is sometimes a symptom of sleep apnea. In fact, nocturia among younger individuals--who are less likely to have other medical causes of nocturia--is a strong indicator of sleep apnea. While the precise relationship has not been thoroughly studied, it appears that the most likely reason patients with untreated sleep apnea have more frequent urination at night is related to the increased pressure in the right side of the heart. This increased pressure is usually the result of low oxygen levels in the bloodstream caused by the apnea events: when oxygen levels fall, the heart works harder to get oxygen to the brain.

An increased pressure in the heart is a sign that there is too much liquid in the body: when the heart receives the stimulus of the increased pressure, higher levels of a hormone called atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are secreted. ANP is a diuretic that is associated with the increased need to urinate.

When sleep apnea is effectively treated, nighttime urination is also reduced. Studies have shown that ANP levels in patients with untreated sleep apnea are increased and levels reduced in patients using CPAP effectively. Remember, not all causes of frequent urination are related to untreated sleep apnea; prostrate problems, for example, may cause increased need for urination. Discuss any concerns you may have with your doctor.

Patrick J. Strollo, Jr., MD is the Medical Director of the Pulmonary Sleep Evaluation Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School.



American Sleep Apnea Association
1424 K Street NW, Suite 302, Washington, DC 20005
phone: 202/293-3650 fax: 202/293-3656
Privacy Policy Copyright & IP Notice

© 2007 American Sleep Apnea Association



Taxpayer-Funded Research Access (July 23, 2007)

House Backs Taxpayer-Funded Research Access
Final Appropriations Bill Mandates Free Access
to NIH Research Findings

Washington, D.C. – July 20, 2007 – In what advocates hailed as a major advance for scientific communication, the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday approved a measure directing the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to provide free public online access to agency-funded research findings within 12 months of their publication in a peer-reviewed journal. With broad bipartisan support, the House passed the provision as part of the FY2008 Labor, HHS, and Education Appropriations Bill.

“The House has affirmed the principle that broad sharing of publicly funded research findings on the Internet is an essential component of our nation’s investment in science,” said Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), and a leader of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access (ATA). “This action paves the way for all scientists and citizens to access, use, and benefit from the results of publicly funded biomedical research.”

“We’re pleased by Congress’s recognition of the fundamental rationale for public access – that better-informed patients, clinicians, and researchers will mean better health outcomes,” said Sharon Terry, President of the Genetic Alliance and an ATA activist. “The time has come to sweep away unnecessary barriers to understanding and treating disease. The Genetic Alliance thanks and congratulates the House of Representatives for taking this vital step.”

The current NIH Public Access Policy, implemented in 2005 as a voluntary measure, has resulted in the deposit of less than 5% of eligible research by individual investigators.

In a recent letter to Congress, 26 Nobel Laureates called for enactment of mandatory NIH public access, noting that, "requiring compliance is not a punitive measure, but rather a simple step to ensure that everyone, including scientists themselves, will reap the benefits that public access can provide. We have seen this amply demonstrated in other innovative efforts within the NIH – most notably with the database that contains the outcome of the Human Genome Project.”

“The coalition of support for the NIH policy is extremely broad,” added Joseph. “This critical step was achieved as a result of the vision and collective effort of patient groups, scientists, researchers, publishers, students, and consumers who registered their support.”

A similar measure has been approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee and will be considered by the full Senate later this summer.

###

The Alliance for Taxpayer Access is a coalition of patient, academic, research, and publishing organizations that supports open public access to the results of federally funded research. The Alliance was formed in 2004 to urge that peer-reviewed articles stemming from taxpayer-funded research become fully accessible and available online at no extra cost to the American public. Details on the ATA may be found at http://www.taxpayeraccess.org.


Contact ATA
©2004-2007 Alliance for Taxpayer Access: Content distributed under terms of a Creative Commons License.





Prostatitis Article (July 22, 2007)

Maximum Fitness Magazine, Fall 2007 (volume 2 issue 8)has an article by Tom Weede, CSCS that every Prostatitis Patient should read. It is titled: Prostate Prime, Information for Guys who won’t talk about it. On page 64 Tom is quoted as saying, “ You won’t hear most guys talk about it, but prostate issues cause discomfort for millions of men-even those in their thirties.”

Check These Sites (July 19, 2007)

Go to this URL and you will find one chapter from a book about prostatitis. The book is Urology Diseases in America 2007 http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/statistics/uda/Prostatitis-Chapter01.pdf.

www.associatedcontent.com/article/276526/living_with_prostatitis_disease.html
Joel S. Hirschorn

http://www.sil.si.edu/eresources/tfr_ej_vendorresults.cfm?vendor=Free%20E-Journal
Croatian free E-journals

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gquery/gquery.fcgi Pub MED etc cross database search Life Sciences Cross-Database

Here's the online link to a story about prostatitis. :You can buy Best Life Magazine which contains the article at many news stands
http://www.bestlifeonline.com/cms/publish/health-fitness/The_Sex_Destroyer.shtml

Bottom Line Personal Magazine, (http://bottomlinesecrets.com/) June 7, 2007 edition quotes Ira Sharlip, MD on page fifteen as having said , “ Blood in Semen is usually no cause for alarm.” He thinks you should check with a urologist if it persists or if ejaculation is painful. Ira Sharliff, MD is spokesperson for American Urological Association.

Cost of Prostatitis Compared to other Urologic Diseases (June 12, 2007)

Press release from, NIH

Bladder, prostate and other urinary tract diseases cost Americans nearly $11 billion a year, according to a new report from the National Institutes of Health. Medicare’s share exceeded $5.4 billion.

The five most expensive urologic problems — accounting for $9.1 billion — are, in descending order, urinary tract infections, kidney stones, prostate and bladder cancers and benign prostate enlargement, according to the authors of Urologic Diseases in America. The report was published online this spring and will be available in print and on CD in early May.

“This research sharply illustrates the immense burden of urologic diseases and the importance of studies to preempt disease processes and develop targeted treatments,” said Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., NIH Director.

Five years in the making, Urologic Diseases in America stitches together a patchwork of reliable data, both new and previously published, revealing numbers of people affected, treatment patterns and economic cost.

TOP DISEASES BY COST
Infection (Women & Men)
$3.5 Billion

Kidney Stones
$2.1 Billion

Prostate Cancer
$1.3 Billion

Bladder Cancer
$1.1 Billion

BPH/Prostate Enlargement
$1.1 Billion

Urinary Incontinence
$463.1 Million

Kidney Cancer
$401.4 Million

Erectile Dysfunction
$327.6 Million

Urethral Stricture
$191.1Million

Prostatitis
$84.4 Million

Interstitial Cystitis/PBS
$65.9 Million

Here's the link for the NIDDK press release. http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/may2007/niddk-01.htm


Keep in mind that Infection, Erectile Dysfunction and Urethral Strictures can sometimes be caused by prostatitis so the number for prostatitiis is probably higher than indicated in this table. There is a huge diagnostic overlap with these diseases.
Prostatitis Foundation


Blood in Semen (June 11, 2007)

Bottom Line Personal Magazine, (http://bottomlinesecrets.com/) June 7, 2007 edition, quotes Ira Sharlip, MD on page fifteen as having said , “ Blood in Semen is usually no cause for alarm.” He thinks you should check with a urologist if it persists or if ejaculation is painful.
Ira Sharliff,MD, is spokesperson for The American Urological Association.

New Article about Prostatitis (May 15, 2007)

On the stands now you can find the May Issue of Best Life Magazine with an article about prostatitis.
Prostatitis Foundation

Available Clinical Trials (April 26, 2007)

For information on available clinical trials go to: http://ClinicalTrials.gov/

Prostatitis and PSA (March 29, 2007)

This quote was taken from a medline email newsletter and appeared in the urology discussion list. We get a lot of questions about prostatitis causing PSA fluctuations.
Prostatitis Foundation

I had cases of prostatitis class-2 NIH with psa of 13 which later to 5 and to normal with 1 month treatment of anti biotic and alfa blocker.

The Enigma of Prostatitis (January 12, 2007)


This booklet “The Enigma of Prostatitis”, based on IPHC discussions with other international experts, at the ancient French port of Saint Malo, on the northern coast of Brittany, offers expert opinion in a simply presented, well illustrated and easily assimilated manner.Order blanks for the booklet are available on the top right side of the prostatitis.org homepage. It is well illustrated and in color.

K.G. NABER, B. LOBEL, W. WEIDNER, F. ALGABA, D. PREZIOSO, L.F. DENIS & K. GRIFFITHS

Contents

SOME INTRODUCTORY ISSUES AND GUIDELINES
-THE INTERNATIONAL PROSTATE HEALTH COUNCIL
-AN INTRODUCTION TO PROSTATITIS
-THE PROSTATE GLAND:WHERE IS IT
AND WHAT DOES IT DO?
-PROSTATE AWARENESS
-DISORDERS OF THE PROSTATE:
WHAT GOES WRONG?
THE ENIGMA OF PROSTATITIS:WHAT IS IT AND CAN IT BE CLASSIFIED
-EPIDEMIOLOGY: THE PREVALENCE OF CHRONIC PROSTATITIS / CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN
-WHICH PATHOGENS ARE IMPLICATED IN PROSTATITIS?
-SOME RELEVANT EUROPEAN DATA ON CHRONIC BACTERIAL PROSTATITS
-THERE ARE OTHER PATHOGENS TO BE CONSIDERED
-THE MOLECULAR APPROACH TO THE AETIOLOGY OF PROSTATITIS
THE HISTORY AND TRATMENT OUTCOME OF PROSTATIS
-DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF PROSTATITIS
-ACUTE BACTERIAL PROSTATIS
-INFLAMMATORY CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN SYNDROME
-SOME ISSUES REGARDING TREATMENT WITH ANTIMICROBIALS
-USE OF ALPHA-BLOCKERS TO TREAT PROSTITIS
-TREATMENT WITH ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AGENTS
-OTHER THERAPEUTIC AGENTS USED IN PROSTATITIS
-A VIEW POINT ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PROSTATITIS
-THE CLINICAL MANAGEMENT WOULD APPEAR COMPLEX AND ARVITARY
-THE ROLE OF THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER
SOME HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES DIRECTED TO THE PATHOGENESIS OF PROTATITIS
-SEXUALITY
-UNDERSTANDING THE PATHOLOGY OF PROSTATITIS
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PROTATE DISEASE
-IMPRINTING: OESTROGENIC SIGNALS IN UTERO
-A NEW CONCEPT: PROLIFERATIVE INFLAMMATORY ATROPHY
-FREE RADICALS, ANTIOXIDANTS
SOME REFLECTIONS ON PROSTATITIS
IS THERE A RATIONAL PATHOGENESIS?
-SOME MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF A PROSTATIC
PRENEOPLASTIC LESION?
-TREATMENT WITH ANTIMICROBIALS
REFERENCES
-4 PAGES OF REFERENCES

Drug Could Prevent Prostate Gland Swelling (November 16, 2006)

Go to medscape.com/viewarticle/547313 to see all of the article below.
You might want to discuss it with your doctor.

By Patricia Reaney

LONDON (Reuters) Nov 06 - Drugs that regulate the hormone estrogen may help to prevent enlargement of the prostate gland in older men, Australian scientists said on Monday.

Researcher-makes-major-biofilm-dispersion-breakthrough (October 23, 2006)

Here is a website that includes a picture of David Davies who may have made a discovery that will be very important to chronic prostatitis patients
http://www.newsguide.us/education/science/Binghamton-University
-researcher-makes-major-biofilm-dispersion-breakthrough/

Mechanism Of The Sexual Transmission Of Disease (October 23, 2006)

If you have asked the question about passing something to your partner, put the two lines below in Google and go to the article.
Rafael Chacon: Mechanism Of The Sexual Transmission Of Disease. The Internet Journal of Urology. 2006. Volume 3 Number 2.

Why Do So Many Men Develop Prostatitis? (October 20, 2006)

For the complete article go to www.JohnsHopkinsHealthAlerts.com. They begin by saying, ”Chronic prostatitis usually affects men in their early 40s, and it is one of the leading reasons why men visit a urologist.”

To chronic and short term prostatitis patients (October 11, 2006)


To chronic and short term prostatitis patients.

We want to inform each of you about the clinical trials available now. The research centers need a steady flow of new patients to complete this research to determine the cause and cure for prostatitis. There is an urgent need for this research, which will enable researchers to weed out false leads and explore hopeful possibilities.

The Prostatitis Foundation has asked Congress for funds, which enable the NIH (National Institute of Health) to fund this research. These researchers want to enroll prostatitis patients to complete these clinical trials. You can contact one of these centers to see if you are eligible.


University of Washington-Harborview Medical Center
Seattle, Washington
John N. Krieger, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Susan O. Ross, RN, (206) 543-3898
or Leslie Butler (206) 616-7416

Temple University School of Medicine
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Michel A. Pontari, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Melody Santiago, RN, (215) 707-3783

The University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, Mississippi
Paige White, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Dell Lumpkin, LPN (610) 984-5195

Massachusetts General Hospital & Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts
Mary McNaughton-Collins, M.D., M.P.H., Principal Investigator
Michael P. O'Leary, M.D., M.P.H.
Contact: Priya Desai, (617) 732-7223

University of Sciences Malaysia
Penang, Malaysia
Liong Men Long, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Shaun Lee Wen Huey, nuahsell@yahoo.com slwhuey@u.washington.edu, Mobile: 012-2030508

University of Maryland
Baltimore, Maryland
Richard B. Alexander, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Judy Murray, CCRC (410) 328-5784

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, Illinois
Anthony J. Schaefer, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Darlene Marko RN, BSN, CCRC (312) 695-3898

Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio
Daniel Shoskes, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Donel Murphy, RN (216) 445-7505

Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
J. Curtis Nickel, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Joe Downey, M.Sc., CCRP (613) 548-7832
or Janet Clark-Pereira ACT, CCRP (613) 548-7805

Stanford University Medical Center
Stanford, California
Rodney Anderson, M.D., Principal Investigator
Contact: Christine Chan, M.D., (650) 498-4240

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Los Angeles, CA
Mark S. Litwin, MD, MPH, Principal Investigator
Contact: Gwendolyn Byrd, MA (310) 267-2526

Charles R. Drew University
Los Angeles, CA
Nand S. Datta, MD, Co-Investigator
Contact: Kawajalen Mervin (310) 668-4545

The Inigma of Prostatitis (October 6, 2006)

In a teaching guide called: The Inigma of Prostatitis, put together by the International Prostate Health Council(IPHC)Professor Roger Kirby a member of the IPHC has indicated that in his extensive Harley Street practice the management of prostatitis and BPH consumed the major portion of his time spent on the management of prostate disorders. Although important, the patients with cancer take up less than 20% of his practice activity.

Stanford Physical Therapy and Relaxation Treatment Improves Sexual Function (September 30, 2006)

New research showing what has come to be known as the Stanford Protocol, involving a specific kind of pelvic floor trigger point release and Paradoxical Relaxation of the pelvic floor can not only improve pain symptoms but also sexual symptoms has just been published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology. Stanford urologist Rodney Anderson, MD, presented this study at the American Urological Association meeting last May. (See our wrap-up of that meeting, including news of this study www.prostatitis.org/AmericanUrologicalMeeting06.html.)

Now that the study has been published in a medical journal, urologists and the wider medical community will be more aware this kind of therapy and its value for men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), including help for sexual symptoms, which have a huge impact on quality of life. This builds on the study by the Stanford team presented last year showing that the Stanford protocol could improve overall symptoms, especially pain and urinary problems. The protocol, which includes physical therapy that releases trigger points in internal and external muscles and relaxation, was developed by David Wise, PhD, himself a longtime CP/CPPS sufferer, and Dr. Anderson.

This study included 146 men who had CP/CPPS were weren’t helped by other treatments. Their average age was 42—not an age when men are expected to have sexual dysfunction, but most of them (92%) did. Their symptoms included ejaculatory pain, low sexual desire, and erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction. Seventy percent of the patients said they had overall improvement with this therapy. And among the men who were helped, sexual symptoms improved by an average 77% to 87% on the Pelvic Pain Symptom Survey. The men who showed the greatest improvement overall had the greatest improvement in their sexual symptoms. The study showed that this therapy can help men with CP/CPPS, not only by easing pain but also by improving their sexual function, which plays an important role in their relationships and quality of life.

You can read the abstract of this study here at http://www.pelvicpainhelp.com/#pub, on the team’s website.
http://www.pelvicpainhelp.com/

Pathogens in Chronic Prostatitis? (September 12, 2006)

There has never been a complete agreement about the presence of pathogens in chronic prostatitis. There are those that are convinced they are not there and those who are convinced we just do not know how to test for them. In the summer issue 2006 of CURE (cancer update research and education) there is an article written by Elizabeth Whittington with additional reporting by Jennifer M.Gangloff. They say on page 52, "a mere 1% of bacteria and 5% of fungi have even been identified. The magazine website is www.curetoday.com to.

July 2006 issue of Contemporary Urology (August 14, 2006)

The July 2006 issue of Contemporary Urology contains an excellent article, starting on page 30, titled: Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome. It was written by Dr. J. Curtis Nickel
The article began by saying, “The traditional biomedical model that has driven our understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome has failed to yield an effective treatment strategy for the majority of affected patients.”

The article gives us a good overview of the research efforts underway and some treatments being evaluated. However, the closing statement was, “ The patient must be counceled that this is a chronic disease and the role of the urologist is not necessarily to cure, but to ameliorate symptoms and improve quality of life.”

Association between sleep apnea and erectile dysfunction? (August 7, 2006)

In the Department of Urology, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10021, USA. Researchers Teloken PE, Smith EB, Lodowsky C, Freedom T, Mulhall JP investigated a possible link between sleep apnea and erectile dysfunction?

They concluded, “Men presenting with symptoms consistent with Sleep Aapnea Syndrome have a significant risk of erectile dysfunction, and the correlation between the severity of sleep apnea and the severity of erectile dysfunction is strong.”

The Prostatitis Foundation had previously reported a link between sleep apnea and frequent urination, especially during the night.

PROSTATITIS TAKES CENTER STAGE AT THE 2006 AMERICAN UROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION MEETING. (July 6, 2006)

Go to the left column on the webpage and scroll down to Abstract Summaries from 2006 AUA Annual Meetings and you can read about the plenary session overview of chronic prostatitis, plus the research summaries.

The -itis epidemic (June 18, 2006)

"Inflammation is the culprit behind dozens of common health woes" according to Camille Noe Pagin. She was writing in the May 2006 issue of Health Magazine. The article starts on page 98.
She further states that,"Inflammation is your immune systen's response to an insult-an injury, like a pulled muscle or a cut or an "intruder" such as an allergan, bacteria, virus or chemical irritant."

NIH Sponsored Clinical Trials (April 21, 2006)

For those interested in joining the prostatitis/CPPS clinical trials: Dr. Alexander has made a recruitment tape to explain the importance of participating. You can obtain one free by sending an email to the webmaster with your mailing address. Put VCR Tape in the heading of the email so it will not get deleted with spam.
We have asked for research and should support these clinical trials by contacting the nearest research center.
Prostatitis Foundation

Inflammatory theory of prostatitis (March 28, 2006)

For those interested in an inflammatory theory of prostatitis you might be interested in this theory applied to heart disease. An article, by Stacey Colino, which can be found at http://www.view.remedyonline.com/ published in Remedy Magazine, lays it out in the first paragraph. Article is titled; Your Healthy Heart: The Role of Inflammation

October 2005 Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Workshop (February 11, 2006)


A new patient friendly summary of information from The October 2005 Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Scientific Workshop at the Baltimore Washington International airport is now available from the www.prostatitis.org website . Look down the column on the left side and click on 2005.

Prostate Massage (February 4, 2006)

2-4-06
Leonard Staller P.A.-C is a Physician’s Assistant who has been practicing urology in the Pamona, New Jersey area since 1992.. He will be happy to treat new prostatitis patients. He offers prostate massage for those seeking it. He can be reached by email at Installer6@aol.com

Prostatic disease Bariloche, Argentina. (February 4, 2006)

Official Webcasts from the SIU (Société Internationale d'Urologie) Meeting on Prostatic disease Bariloche, Argentina. Sept. 29-Oct. 1, 2005. http://webcasts.prous.com/SIU2005/.

Abstracts from the prostatitis/CPPS Workshop in Baltimore (January 30, 2006)

http://www.niddk.nih.gov/fund/other/cpp/images/CPP05AbstractBook.pdf

Smallest Bacteria Found in Chronic Prostatitis (January 26, 2006)

Mandar R, Raukas E, Turk S, Korrovits P, Punab M.Mycoplasmas in semen of chronic prostatitis patients. Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(6):479-82.

Mycoplasmas, a type of bacteria, are some of the smallest free-living organisms. Various species are found in healthy people, especially in the mouth and genitourinary tract, but some have been associated with disease, including various urinary tract diseases and some immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases. They are difficult to identify and culture, and a kit commonly used to detect them does not distinguish well among different species. These Estonian researchers looked for mycoplasmas in the semen of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and healthy controls. Using the kit first in 161 men, including healthy men and those with all categories of CP/CPPS (IIIa, the inflammatory type with white blood cells in semen and IIIb, the noninflammatory type, and IV, the inflammatory type with no symptoms). The kit detected mycoplasmas in all the groups of men, but a more precise method of identifying the bacterial species called polymerase chain reaction (PCR), used in 60 of these men, detected mycoplasmas more often in chronic prostatitis patients than healthy men. A quarter of the men with chronic prostatitis had mycoplasmas compared with about a fifth of the controls. In addition, the mycoplasmas occurred more frequently in the semen of men with category IIIa disease than in the healthy men. No healthy man had either Ureaplasma parvum or Mycoplasma gentialium, but some men in all categories of CP/CPPS had U parvum, and some men with IIIa disease had M genitalium. Although the numbers of patients in each group were very small, the differences between the CP/CPPS patients and controls for these two species were statistically significant. Further research has to be done to show whether these organisms may actually cause or trigger CP/CPPS.

CP/CPPS May Affect Fertility (January 26, 2006)

Henkel R, Ludwig M, Schuppe HC, Diemer T, Schill WB, Weidner W. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome/chronic prostatitis affect the acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa. World J Urol. 2006 Jan 11;:1-6 [Epub ahead of print]

There are a number of ways to check a man’s fertility. Traditionally, those have included sperm counts, sperm motility (the proportion of sperm that swim), and normal appearance. More recently, fertility experts have used the acrosome reaction to assess sperm quality. That reaction, in which the head of the sperm ruptures and releases enzymes, is the one that allows the sperm to penetrate the egg. Infection is known to have a negative effect on sperm quality and fertility, and inflammation is thought to have a negative effect. These German researchers looked at traditional measures of sperm quality and measurements of the acrosome reaction in normal men and men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), who often have evidence of inflammation (category IIIa, with white blood cells in the semen). and found that men with CP/CPPS appear to have significantly lower sperm quality, fewer acrosome reactions, and lower acrosome-reaction potential. The researchers compared these measurements between 95 control men and 56 men with CP/CPPS, including 24 with type IIIA and 32 with type IIIb. They found that men with both types of CP/CPPS had significantly lower sperm counts, lower proportions of normal sperm, and lower levels of acrosome reactions, and lower acrosome reaction potential.

Prostatitis Manual (January 23, 2006)

We are temporarily out of copies of the Prostatitis Manual. Please hold your orders until the order form goes up on the website again.
It is being revised for the next printing.
Prostatitis Foundation

Nine-step symptom check (January 4, 2006)

The Prostatitis Foundation invites men who have been diagnosed with or suspect that they may have prostatitis to undertake a nine-step symptom check to determine the severity of their existing symptoms.

The Prostatitis Foundation today issued a media advisory urging men, particularly those who have been diagnosed with or suspect that they may have chronic prostatitis, to take the nine-step Prostatitis Symptom Index to assess the severity of their existing symptoms and measure response to therapy.

The advisory was issued amid growing concerns about prostatitis, following the well-publicized resignation of Australia's Deputy Prime Minister John Anderson in July this year. Anderson, 48, quit his position because of prostatitis, which he referred to as "a stress-related prostate condition," from which he had suffered for 12 years (The Sydney Morning Herald, www.smh.com.au).

Interested parties may take the Prostatitis Symptom Index by going to the Prostatitis Foundation's website, www.prostatitis.org, said the Foundation's spokesman

The Symptom Index poses nine key questions that will help determine the degree of symptoms among individuals suffering from prostatitits or CPPS.
Among the significant areas covered by the Prostatitis Symptom Index are: pain or discomfort in the area below the waist, particularly around the crotch and bladder area, pain or discomfort during sex or urination, frequency of urination and how these symptoms have affected the person's general quality of life.

Daniel Shoskes, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation cautions that NIH-CPSI does not diagnose prostatitis as men and even women without prostatitis can score highly on the index due to other illnesses.

Disclaimer: The Prostatitis Foundation distributes literature and information relevant to prostatitis. While we encourage all research, we do not endorse any doctor, medicine, or treatment protocol. Please consult with your own physician for all your medical needs.

Chronic, recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (December 26, 2005)

The December 2005 issue of Urology Times in an article on page 26-7 by Mac Overmyer quotes Scott Hultgren, Helen L. Stover Professor of Molecular Microbiology, at Washington University School of Medicine as saying, “According to his research, recurrent infections are probably more accurately described as resurgent infections because they evolve from quiescent reservoirs established not on the surface of bladder lumen, but in colonies within the umbrella cells of the bladder.”


Nocturnal Urination and Sleep Apnea? (December 25, 2005)

Nocturia, or nocturnal urination, is sometimes a symptom of sleep apnea,” as explained by Patrick J. Strollo, Jr, MD who is the Medical Director of the Pulmonary Sleep Evaluation Laboratory at the University of Pittsburg Medical School. He writes the, Ask The Doctor, column that you can see in the August –September 1996 issue of WAKE-UP Call on sleepapnea.org: go to resources –publications and down to Health Issues for the complete article.

Examine of the urine after prostate massage (November 8, 2005)

Examination of the urine after prostatic massage is beneficial in patients
with prostatitis; according to a recent study

An Italian study has concluded that microscopic examination of urine after
prostatic massage is a feasible indicator of prostatic inflammation.

The study, called “Microscopic and microbiological findings for evaluation
of chronic prostatitis,” by Magri et al., in the Archives of Italian
Urology and Andrology, covered 233 patients with symptoms suggesting
prostatitis, but who did not have urethral discharge. The same urologist
evaluated all the patients by performing a medical history, physical
examination, and transrectal ultrasound.

The study said 47% of the 233 patients had a positive urethral culture,
35% a positive culture of the seminal fluid and 13% had a positive culture
of one or more samples of the four-specimen localization test.

According to the study, more than 10 leukocytes in the post-massage urine
were observed in 49% of patients with a positive culture of the seminal
fluid.

Reference:
Microscopic and microbiological findings for evaluation of chronic
prostatitis. by Magri V, Cariani L, Bonamore R, Restelli A, Garlaschi MC,
Trinchieri A. in Arch Ital Urol Androl. 2005 Jun;77(2):135-8.

Four Articles from Urology Times (October 5, 2005)

The link to Urology Times on the right side of the homepage now has four new articles about prostatitis recently purchased from Urology Times for free distribution by the Prostatitis Foundation

Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Scientific Workshop October 19-21 (September 21, 2005)

Review off NIH Studies-What have we learned? By Anthony Schaffer, October 19th at 8:40 am
Are all Diseases Infectious? By Bennett Lora, October 20th 1:15 pm
Is CP/CPPS Due to an Unculturable Pathogen, (TBD) October 20th 1:45 pm
Review of the Use of Antibiotics in CP/CPPS, by Daniel Shoskes October 21st, 8:35 pm
Review of Non Antibiotic Treatment in CP/CPPS, by J. Curtis Nicol, October 21nd 9:05 pm


The Magic of Lyrica (Pregabalin) (August 29, 2005)

The Magic of Lyrica (Pregabalin)

Jon Bernardes, long term Prostatitis Sufferer, Shropshire, United Kingdom.

Diagnosed with Chronic Prostatitis in January 1994, I have lived with pain and discomfort (not to mention more usual prostate symptoms such as urgency, frequency, pain on urinating) for over 11 years. I was a previously fit and healthy middle class professional then in my mid forties. Since 1994, I had not had one single day when pain management wasn’t the over-riding issue in my life. As with many chronic pain sufferers, I managed to keep working but gave up any kind of social life, lost fitness and began to look forward to retirement just to end the daily struggle of getting to a (thankfully very flexible) job. The various management strategies involved 4 components: a regular (16 week) caudal block, acupuncture (4-6 weekly), Dothiepin (an anti-depressant which also interacts with acupuncture to relieve pain), and the main daily drug of Coproxamol – ranging from 2/3 tables on a ‘good day’ to the maximum dose of 8 on a ‘bad day’.

With the end of Coproxamol prescribing in sight in the UK, I tried a wide range of other prescription painkillers with my GP’s help – all were far less effective than Coproxamol and some had unpleasant side effects. About to panic (and very depressed) I attended my regular caudal block and discussed the issue with my Pain Consultant who suggested a new drug: Lyrica ( a.k.a Pregabalin - licensed for use on neuropathic pain in July 2004 – see European Medicines Agency: http://www.emea.eu.int/humandocs/Humans/EPAR/lyrica/lyrica.htm ; at time of writing the drug is not on UK Pfizer site but the American review can be seen at: http://www.pfizer.com/pfizer/are/investors_releases/2004pr/mn_2004_1231.jsp OR
http://www.drugdevelopment-technology.com/projects/pregabalin/ ).

I contacted my very helpful GP and got a prescription – so my years of pain came to an end – not simply and immediately but after some experimentation and careful management.

From the very first tablet, I realised that I had simply forgotten what life without pain could be like – initially, these were only brief periods between a range of side effects –most notably, a distinct dizziness and headaches (the latter probably due to withdrawing the Coproxamol). Initially I tried one 75Mg tablet 12 hourly….the dizziness continued and the pain began to feel like it might return after 6 hours and did return with a vengeance towards 12 hours.

Within a week, I dared to try a cycle ride in the pain free period and found that I managed a mile or two with no ill effects; I repeated this with time and found that such exercise did not seem to lead to pain crises (as it had in the past). To tackle the midday pain, I moved to 75Mg tablets 8 hourly and found this much more effective in terms of continual pain control BUT found myself in a continual haze (not unpleasant but I did not like to drive); the bike riding and exercise developed well and I began to have patches of feeling really well and pain free.

My GP then agreed to prescribe 50Mg tablets and this dose 8 hourly has removed the haze and any dizziness. After nearly three whole months, I am pain free, regularly riding my bike (6 – 9 miles a day) and have returned to my favourite exercise – Jogging. I started VERY carefully with one minute jogs but am now up to 60 minutes. My wife and I had a marvellous 2 week holiday in Crete where I swam regularly, walked miles, hiked up and down mountain gorges and generally managed like a perfectly healthy person. I am losing some weight and beginning to feel much healthier and, strangely, some of the prostate symptoms are also abating. Lyrica, however, is not a cure – if I forget a tablet for a few hours, the familiar nagging pains in perineum, lower abdomen and lower back pop-up BUT taking the tablet and relaxing for an hour or two usually solves the problem.

Strangely, I cannot find much mention of patient experiences with Lyrica on the internet and I am still not really sure what ‘neuropathic pain’ is BUT this stuff is simply magic for me and my prostatitis. So far, there are limited side effects – the dizziness seems to disappear after a while and the drug appears to ‘target’ the pain very well. A broken tooth hurt like hell despite my prostate pain being completely absent; previous painkillers (such a Coproxamol) seem to hit your whole system and mask any and all pains; Lyrica seems to just control the long term prostate pain.

I have no idea whether this drug will work for anyone else but do suggest that you talk to your GP and give it a try – be prepared, though, to take control and experiment with dose strength and period (I am on 3 * 50Mg = 150Mg daily; the maximum is 600 Mg a day so I guess there is room to manoeuvre. The drug comes in 25 mg, 50 mg, 75 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg capsules so it should be possible for anyone to experiment with dosage until they have good pain control….BEST OF LUCK!

Time and continuing permitting, I will try and respond to any queries to J.Bernardes@wlv.ac.uk but please be patient – PLEASE provide a subject line including “LYRICA”.






Does Bacterial-induced Inflammation Play a Role in Prostate Cancer? (July 16, 2005)

Does Bacterial-induced Inflammation Play a Role in Prostate Cancer?

Cohen RJ, Shannon BA, McNeal JE, Shannon T, Garrett KL. Propionibacterium acnes associated with inflammation in radical prostatectomy specimens: a possible link to cancer evolution? J Urol. 2005 Jun;173(6):1969-74.

These Australian researchers cultured microorganisms from the prostate tissue taken out during radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. The team also looked at the tissue microscopically for inflammation. The most common organism they detected was a type of bacteria known as Propionibacterium acnes, which they found in 35% of the prostate samples. Also, they saw significantly more inflammation in the prostate tissue from men who had P acnes than men who didn’t. They found that the P acnes bacteria in prostate tissue had characteristics that are different from the P acnes normally found on skin. The researchers suggested that these bacteria may be involved in the inflammation they saw and possibly in prostate cancer itself.

Two Groundbreaking Research Studies Published (June 26, 2005)

Newsletter 2-05

This information was provided to us courtesy of Interstitial Cystitis Association

The January 2004 edition of Urology featured two groundbreaking research papers from ICA Medical Advisory Board members Susan Keay, MD, PhD, John Warren, MD, and their colleagues at the University of Maryland.

In a paper entitled Antiproliferative factor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, and epidermal growth factor in men with interstitial cystitis versus chronic pelvic pain syndrome, Dr. Keay and her colleagues showed that the urinary marker they discovered, antiproliferative factor (APF), occurs in men with IC and can help distinguish men with IC from men who have chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), commonly called “chronic prostatitis.”
Disorder Shows A Possible Genetic Link
( We could not include all of this study because of space limitations.)

Prospects for New medicine (June 10, 2005)

In the June 13 Issue of Business Week on page 30 there was an article about Biotech finally starting to pay off. They say, “Last year alone, the Food and Drug administration approved 20 biotech drugs, among them treatments for insomnia, multiple sclerosis, severe pain, chronic kidney disease, incontinence, mouth sores, and cancer.”

Prostatitis Research atAUA Annual Meeting (May 29, 2005)

To read about the poster session presentations and abstracts from the AUA 2005 Annual Meeting go to web page: http://www.aua2005.org/am05/content/abstracts/index.cfm

Pelvic Floor Therapy--NY (May 17, 2005)


We are frequently asked if the pelvic floor therapy is available in the NY area. A patient who says he has had good luck with that therapy has sent us these addresses and this information:
www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com
www.hdphysicaltherapy.com
www.duffyandbracken.com

He listed one Urologist:
Dr. David Kaufman
Central Park South
NY, NY
212-969-9540

You will need to check these out for yourself, as the foundation does not endorse any doctor, medicine or treatment protocol.

Clinical Trials for prostatitis (April 7, 2005)

The National Institute of Health has appropriated money to conduct research to find a cause and cure for prostatitis/CPPS. It is important for patients to participate in these clinical trials if they can qualify. The NIH needs to see that we are anxious to help them with this research . Please contact the research center nearest you or the one you prefer from the list available on the www.uppcrn.org website. When you get to that site click on the CPCRN website Click on the contacts tab and find the center that interests you for their contact information.
Prostatitis Foundation

Urinalysis: A Comprehensive Review (March 17, 2005)

To see this excellent article go to www,aafp.com and click onto their current issue which is Volume 71 Number 6 • March 15, 2005. Their webpage describes it thus, “Urinalysis: A Comprehensive Review
JEFF A. SIMERVILLE, M.D., WILLIAM C. MAXTED, M.D., AND JOHN J. PAHIRA, M.D.
Urinalysis provides clues in the diagnosis of calculi, urinary tract infection, and malignancy. The dipstick test can detect conditions such as hematuria and proteinuria. Identification of casts, cells, crystals, and bacteria by microscopic examination may help physicians diagnose a variety of conditions.”

Immune System Treatments (March 14, 2005)

For those of you interested in the immune system there is an interesting article in the March 14th 2005 issue of Business Week. On page 42 they say, “When the immune system goes bad it goes very, very bad.”
In a sidebar they say, “ Drugs aimed at correcting autoimmune diseases often have unforseen impacts.”

Nanotechnology (March 14, 2005)

In the February 14th issue of Business Week there was a long article about Nanotechnology. On page 71 they say, “More Dramatic breakthroughs are expected in two or three years as companies developing novel medical procedures begin to emerge from the regulatory maze. Already nano-ized versions of existing drugs are causing a stir.”

Nanotechnology (March 14, 2005)

In the February 14th issue of Business Week there was a long article about Nanotechnology. On page 71 they say, “More Dramatic breakthroughs are expected in two or three years as companies developing novel medical procedures begin to emerge from the regulatory maze. Already nano-ized versions of existing drugs are causing a stir.”

(February 19, 2005)

January 11, 2005 11:10 AM US Eastern Timezone

Nanobac Life Sciences Announces Publication of Results in the Journal of Urology Demonstrating Significant Improvement in Symptoms of Prostatitis Using comET Therapy

TAMPA, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 11, 2005--Nanobac Life Science, Inc. (OTCBB:NNBP), announced today results of a study providing evidence that its patented combination of EDTA, tetracycline and a proprietary blend of nutritional supplements (comET Therapy) demonstrated significant improvement in symptoms in a group of patients with prostatitis or Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS). The observational study, lead by Daniel A. Shoskes, M.D., of Cleveland Clinic Florida, demonstrated a significant decrease in the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score in patients with recalcitrant prostatitis who took 3 months of Nanobac's proprietary comET nanobiotic regimen. The results of the study currently appear online and will appear in the print version of the Journal of Urology, Vol. 173, February 2005.


The treated group of fifteen patients had prostatic stones and longstanding Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) symptoms unresponsive to multiple prior conventional therapies. The treatment is designed to eliminate stone forming Nanobacteria. The study found 80% of the patients had a significant improvement in symptoms after 3 months of the comET regimen. Two patients who had been on complete medical disability have returned to work.

"The study population represented a truly 'hard core' group of patients who had failed multiple previous therapies including antibiotics, phytotherapy, alpha blockers, neuromuscular therapies and prostatic massage," said Daniel Shoskes, MD, study principal investigator. "A response of such magnitude, even in an uncontrolled study is noteworthy in this patient population."

We will be bringing more information about this development

Research Center Trials Beginning 2005 (January 25, 2005)

.
In 1997, the NIDDK formed the first Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network (CPCRN) comprised of six clinical centers to conduct epidemiologic and clinical trial studies examining the nature, treatment and prevention of this disease.

The NIDDK is building on the work begun by the CPCRN. An expanded research network has been organized to conduct additional clinical trials of promising therapeutic interventions. The new CPCRN is comprised of 11 clinical centers and a data-coordinating center. Ancillary studies will be conducted in conjunction with the clinical trials.

This study is for men who have been recently diagnosed with chronic prostatitis and have not received a lot of past treatments for their symptoms.

The will be another trial starting later for chronic patients who have failed other treatments


For more information about these trials see www.uppcrn.org

This Information Forwarded by Prostatitis Foundation

Serum PSA Levels of 4.0 ng/mL or less (December 30, 2004)

The weekly email letter from Medscape (urology edition) has an article: Should Men With Serum PSA Levels of 4.0 ng/mL or Less Undergo a Prostate Biopsy? The authors were J. Brantley Thompson and William L. Valk from the University of Kansas, Medical Center. It was printed in Nat Clin Pract Urol 1(1): 12 13, 2004 Nature Publishing Group.

Last week they had the article by Richard Alexander on the Treatment of Chronic Prostatitis.
See www.medscape.com

Diagnosing and Treating Infections (December 23, 2004)


We want to call your attention to the book on our website by Dr. Toth: Fertile vs. Infertile, How infections affect your fertility and your baby’s health. The chapters particularly relative to a prostatitis patient are:
Chapter 2
The heart of the matter: Vertically and Horizontally Transmitted Infections.
Chapter 4
Diagnosing and Treating Infections.
ON page 90 where Dr Toth discusses chlamydia he says, “It is now believed that up to 50 percent of sexually active teenagers acquire this infection”
Another source claims that 75% of women that have chlamydia don’t know it.

Prostatitis or interstitial cystitis? (December 10, 2004)

We have forwarded an email from a patient about how his diagnosis went from prostatitis to interstitial cystitis into the column: It worked for me. He thought it worth sharing with others.

Diagnosing and Treating Infections (December 10, 2004)

We have put up a lead on the front of the webpage today to help anyone purchase Dr. Toth’s book called Fertile vs.Infertile. Dr. A. Toth is an Obstetrician, Gynecologist & Pathologist. Chapter 3: Diagnosing and Treating Infections should be interesting to a prostatitis patient. When discussing pathogens he says, “ The major players are commonly categorized as follows: chlamydia, the mycoplasma group , aerobic bacteria, anerobic bacteria, parasites, viruses and yeast.” He discusses each of the categories individually.

Cranberry for Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections (December 5, 2004)

The question keeps coming up about Cranberry Juice for prevention and treatment of Urinary Tract Infections.
If you go to aafp.org you will find an index of the contents for their magazine. Look in the current issue. This month you can read an article that concludes Cranberry Juice and/or tablets may help in preventing urinary tract infections but do not effect a cure.

New Additions (November 11, 2004)

We have a letter from Dr Alexander Mackenzie about his use of estrogen. Go to the left hand column of website and click on Treatments and Forms of Prostatitis. Click on estrogen to see a copy of his letter.
We have also added copies of articles from Urology Times: Sequential monotherapy yields poor results in CPCPS and Ejaculatory pain affects 75% of men with CPPS

Pain control (October 7, 2004)

The September/October issue of the AARP Magazine has an article by Elizabeth Enright on page 52 about pain control. (aarpmagazine.org). She discusses new strategies and an array of new medicines.
For Black and white reprints call 800 635 7181 ext 8158

Selenium and vitamin E cancer prevention trial (October 7, 2004)

In the fall issue of Cure Magazine (curetoday.com) devoted to cancer updates, research & education on page 19 Kathy LaTour has written a page on the clinical trials available. There are two prevention trials listed that are seeking patients. Both are studying prostate cancer prevention. More information can be found at (clinicaltrials.gov). Search using the keyword selenium

PSA Controversy Continues (October 6, 2004)

We frequently get questions about PSA tests. It would help if there were agreement among the experts about the PSA test. For some recent information from the US TOO Hot Sheet, which is slanted toward prostate cancer education and support, go to ustoo.org. You can access their archives there or request the October 2004 Hotsheet at:
Us Too International, Inc
Prostate Cancer Support Groups
5003 Fairview Ave
Downers Grove, Illinois 60515-05286
630-795-1002 or 800-808-7866
WWW.ustoo.org

One headline on page 3 reads: Top Professor Calls PSA Test Useless. Other experts Disagree. So What Do Men Do?

Fertile vs. Infertile (September 27, 2004)

Someone called our attention to this book by Dr Toth.We welcome your comments.
Prostatitis Foundation


Fertile vs. Infertile
by A. Toth, M.D.
Hardcover, 6x9 in, 256 pages
Fenestra Books, September 2004
ISBN: 1587363321
Description
Fertile vs. Infertile emphasizes in a very clear way the importance of sexually transmitted infections (STI). In the U.S. alone, about 15 million individuals contract an STI annually. Unfortunately, this field is not given the proper attention by many urologists and gynecologists and by those dealing with infertility. The number of suffering and frustrated patients is therefore extremely high. Young people are rarely informed properly about the high incidence of symptom-free but potentially devastating sexual infections. Hopefully this book will be the badly needed alarm clock for both the lay public and the medical profession.
About the author
Today fifteen percent of married couples suffer from infertility. Dr. Attila Toth's thirty years as a practicing infertility specialist and pathologist have convinced him that the only explanation for this alarming infertility rate, so far out of proportion with natural law, is the increasing presence of contaminating bacteria in the genital tracts of both sexes. In this book, he documents how and why this process has escalated so dramatically over the past few decades of increased sexual activity. Attila Toth, MD; Associate Clinical Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, board certified in both Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pathology. His first book, Fertility Solution was published by Atlantic Monthly in 1991. Practice is limited to infertility and treatment of genital tract infections. 65 E. 79th St. New York, NY 10021. Voice: 212-717-4444; Fax: 212-717-1868

High Price of Prostatitis (August 24, 2004)

To see an article about the high price of prostatitis go to urologytimes.com and scroll down to Cover Story August 1, 2004 where they say, “ Men with chronic prostatitis incur costs nearly double those of rheumatoid arthritis patients.”

Good articles in Urology Times (August 24, 2004)

August 24, 2004

Go to urologytimes.com and scroll down to the July 1st issue. You will find leads to articles titled:
Sequential monotherapy yields poor results in CPPS
Antibiotic, alpha-blocker ineffective for CP/CPPS
If you scroll further down you will find an article titled: Study: No‘magic’PSA threshold exists for biopsy. They say, "Cancer is present in 15% of men with 'normal' PSAs and DREs; 2% have high-grade disease."

Hussein Has Prostate Infection (August 24, 2004)

To see an article about prostatitis on the Website of WebMD Medical News go to: http://my.webmd.com/content/Article/91/101211.htm.
They say, “Official: Hussein Has Prostate Infection; Iraqi Official Says Deposed Leader Otherwise in Good Health.”

Frequent concerns about bike riding. (July 2, 2004)


In a recent article in Family Urology published by American Foundation for Urologic Disease, Volume 9 Issue 1, spring 2004, there is an interesting article titled; Bicycle Riding and Perineal Injuries. The author is Dr. Irwin Goldstein professor of Urology at Boston University School of Medicine. He has spent a lot of time studying the issue and says, “Classic biking-related injuries include: urethral bleeding, urethral stricture formation, perineal numbness, pudendal neuropathy, scrotal injuries, testicular trauma, prostatitis and erectile dysfunction.”
The full text of the article can be found at: http://www.impotence.org/hottopics/bicycle.asp
When you reach www.impotence.org click on current research and findings to see the article.
You will find it an interesting site and might also want to scan the links and resources.
Prostatitis Foundation

PROSTATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH HIGH MEDICAL COSTS (June 16, 2004)

CHICAGO - Patients with chronic prostatitis associated with chronic pelvic pain have substantial health care costs and have reduced quality of life, according to an article in the June 14 issue of The Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "The economic impact of chronic prostatitis warrants increased medical attention and resources to identify and test effective treatment strategies," the researchers conclude.
See entire article at: Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:1231-1236. June 14. Available at www.archinternmed.com
Editor's Note: This study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health/National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Prostatitis Foundation

Reiter’s Syndrome-Prostatitis Symptoms? (May 26, 2004)

Recently in his syndicated column Dr. Peter H. Gott was asked to elaborate on a diagnosis of arthritis caused by Reiter’s syndrome. He responded by saying, “ The syndrome is marked by arthritis, inflammation of the reproductive tract (in both sexes) conjunctivitis (eye inflammation) and superficial ulcers in the mouth or on the genitals.
The diagnosis is made by a blood test called the HLA-B27 tissue antigen”
Early in the existence of this foundation a patient reported a very stubborn case of what had been diagnosed as prostatitis that turned out to be the result of Reiter’s syndrome.
Once in a newsgroup post someone reported that tendonitis, particularly of the Achilles tendon is typical, as is fascitis of the foot among patients with Reiter’s Syndrome. The skin problems include rashes (glans penis pain, balanitis) and painful sores in the mouth.
Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary defines Reiter’s Syndrome as a group of symptoms that appear as a complication of nonspecific urethritis.
We would be interested in more information from others.

Prostatitis Foundation.

Society for Infection and Inflammation (May 23, 2004)


A new group calling themselves the Society for Infection and Inflammation in Urology (SIIU)met at the AUA Annual Meeting in San Francisco. They are a subspecialty society affiliated with The American Urological Association (AUA). The purpose of the SIIU is to provide a forum for AUA members, associate members or guests attending the AUA Annual Meeting to discuss genitourinary tract infection and inflammation.

Their Objectives: this program is designed for the urologic clinician or investigator who has special interest in infectious and noninfectious inflammation in the genitourinary tract. Its purposes are as follows.

1. To increase knowledge and awareness of urinary tract infection in the pathogenesis and treatment of urologic disorders.

2. To increase awareness on non-infectious inflammation in the genitourinary tract and its relation to the pathogenesis and treatment of urologic disorders.

Dr. John Krieger from Seattle conducted a review and discussion of the submitted abstracts at a poster session following the business meeting. We will try to obtain more information about the presentations to bring to you. This should bring in some new ideas and approaches to treatment.

Prostatitis Foundation

Press Conference at AUA Annual Meeting in San Francisco (May 10, 2004)

At a press conference this morning at the AUA Annual Meeting in San Francisco Dr. Richard Alexander summed up the results of the clinical trials done by the eleven research centers in the CPCRN(Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network.)

They compared the two most commonly used treatments against a placebo. They found neither Ciprofloxin or Tamsulosin reduced substantially the symptoms of CP/CPPS after six weeks of therapy in men with moderate to severe symptoms of long duration and with many previous treatments.

He stressed that patients should not get discouraged as there are other developments we will report on later.

Prostatitis Foundation

John Kennedy and Prostatitis (April 14, 2004)

4-14-04
It has been called to our attention that in the recent book An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy 1917-1963 by Robert Dallek published by Little Brown and CO 2003 there is a discussion by the author of Kennedy's prostatitis and symptoms. On page 123 paragraph 3 the author writes, “He was later diagnosed as having “a mild, chronic, non-specific prostatitis” that sulfa drugs temporarily suppressed.” References repeat on page 212 paragraph 2 and page 262 paragraph 2

Prostatitis Foundation Disclaimer Policy (February 25, 2004)

All newsletters and information are provided as a public service by the Prostatitis Foundation. The Foundation does not endorse or assume any liability for any doctor, medicine or treatment protocol. Always work in consultation with your own doctor.
-------------------------------

AARP website has posted information on prostatitis ( , )

The AARP website has posted additional information on prostatitis other than what was in the last issue of The
AARP Magazine http://www.aarpmagazine.org/health/Articles/a2004-11-29-mag-getwell.html
See the January-February edition of the AARP Magazine and the article on page 26 titled: A Wee Problem

New Technique Could Differentiate Infection from Inflammation ( , )

Bettegowda C, Foss CA, Cheong I, Wang Y, Diaz L, Agrawal N, Fox J, Dick J, Dang LH, Zhou S, Kinzler KW, Vogelstein B, Pomper MG. Imaging bacterial infections with radiolabeled 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2005 Jan 25;102(4):1145-50. Epub 2005 Jan 14.

A new imaging technique could help resolve debates about when bacterial infection plays a role in disease by quickly detecting infectious bacteria in tissue. It could distinguish infected tissue from merely inflamed but sterile tissue. Although other imaging methods have been tried, they have been cumbersome or difficult or not very specific. Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, MD, say they have developed a technique that is fairly simple and could translate to the clinic. The method relies on a radioactive tracer that is trapped by an enzyme common to bacteria. The radiotracer they used, [125I]FIAU, has already been used safely in humans. This tracer accumulates in bacteria, and not in inflamed cells, making the infection visible on a specialized type of computed tomography (CT) scan. Using this tracer, the researchers were able to detect infection in tissue caused by five different types of bacteria, and they believe that the technique could be applied to most, if not all, disease-causing bacteria. The technique has the potential to detect infection more quickly and with higher certainty than traditional cultures.

New Book: The Enigma of Prostatitis ( , )

The Prostatitis Foundation is making this excellent book available to patients and order forms are available on the front page of this website. Order one for your doctor also.
---------------
The International Prostate Health Council (IPHC), was established more than a decade ago, as an independent, non-governmental, non-profit organisation. Its main goals include the assessment of the current knowledge base and practice pattern of the physicians concerned with prostate diseases, of the level of awareness of these diseases on the part of the public and the creation of worldwide edu-cational programs and resource materials for urologists, primary care physicians and allied health-care workers.

This booklet ‘The Enigma of Prostatitis’, based on IPHC discussions with other international experts, at the ancient French port of Saint Malo, on the northern coast of Brittany, is another of the series that offers expert opinion in a simply presented, well illustrated and easily assimilated manner.

The booklet targets urologists and primary health-care physicians to help them in their daily practice to understand the mechanisms of prostatic disease, with quality of life of the patient as an endpoint. In line with its independence, the IPHC has been able to present this booklet through the generous financial support of unrestricted educational grants from AstraZeneca, United Kingdom, SPA - Società Prodotti Antibiotici S.p.A., Italy, Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Japan and Sanofi-Aventis S.p.A., Italy.
Louis Denis
( Chairman, IPHC )



Finasteride May Lower Serum PSA Level in Men With Male-Pattern Hair Loss ( , )

According to an article in Medscape Medical News written by News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD and CME Author: Charles Vega, MD, FAAFP
Finasteride May Lower Serum PSA Level in Men With Male-Pattern Hair Loss

New Book Available: The Enigma of Prostatitis. ( , )

We became aware of a great book about prostatitis and we are making it
available to anyone interested in prostatitis. Go to the top right of the prostatitis.org website and find the information and an order blank there. This book will be suitable for patients and doctors alike.
Prostatitis Foundation

European Association of Urology guidelines on chronic pelvic pain. ( , )

This introductory was taken from the National Vulvadinia Association
(NVA) newsletter for Dec 2009. It will enable you to search out complete abstracts and articles. Our thanks to NVA for it's use.
Prostatitis Foundation

EAU guidelines on chronic pelvic pain.
Fall M, Baranowski AP, Elneil S, Engeler D, Hughes J, Messelink EJ, Oberpenning F, de C Williams AC.
Eur Urol. 2009 Aug 31. [Epub ahead of print]

CONTEXT: These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to help urologists assess the evidence-based management of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and to incorporate the recommendations into their clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To revise guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of CPP patients. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Guidelines were compiled by a working group and based on a systematic review of current literature using the PubMed database, with important papers reviewed for the 2003 EAU guidelines as a background. A panel of experts weighted the references. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The full text of the guidelines is available through the EAU Central Office and the EAU Web site (www.uroweb.org). This article is a short version of the full guidelines text and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of CPP. CONCLUSIONS: A guidelines text is presented including chapters on chronic prostate pain and bladder pain syndromes, urethral pain, scrotal pain, pelvic pain in gynaecologic practice, neurogenic dysfunctions, the role of the pelvic floor and pudendal nerve, psychological factors, general treatment of CPP, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation. These guidelines have been drawn up to provide support in the management of the large and difficult group of patients suffering from CPP.

AHRQ Mentored Career Enhancement Award in Patient Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) for Mid-Career and Senior Investigators (K18) ( , )


Application Due Date(s): May 2, 2012, December 18, 2012, December 18, 2013, December 18, 2014
Earliest Anticipated Start Date(s): Approximately four to eight months after the application due date.

The purpose of PCOR is to improve health outcomes by developing and disseminating evidence-based information to patients, clinicians, policy makers, and health care administrators, responding to their expressed needs about which clinical and health system design interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. Research career training objectives and candidates must focus the content on health care delivery within the United States.
For purposes of this FOA, PCOR is defined as the conduct and synthesis of research comparing the benefits and harms of different interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat and monitor health conditions, as well as the delivery of health care in "real world" settings. The purpose of this research is to improve health outcomes by developing and disseminating evidence-based information to patients, clinicians, and other decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances.

For more information please visit: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-12-115.html

( , )

( , )

toal free number 800 891 4200 cancelled

toal free number 800 891 4200 cancelled (September 4, )

2015
We have moved this column to a more relevant place so we can keep you informed of some recent decisions we have made. We have discontinued the toll free number above and the newsletter mailings. WE will start putting newsletters on an archive on the webpage and save the expense of the toll free phone number and mailing the newsletters. Our twentieth anniversary is October the 5th. When we started only twenty five percent of the people had internet access. That has reversed during the twenty years to where only twenty five percent do not have internet connections now. It should allow us more time to improve the website.
Our plans are to start work on redoing the website and updating the links. Please be patient as it will be a slow process.
These postings will continue from time to time so please check occasionally
Prostatitis Foundation
info@prostatitis.org

toal free number 800 891 4200 cancelled (September 4, )

888-891-4200 discontinued
We have moved this column to a more relevant place so we can keep you informed of some recent decisions we have made. We have discontinued the toll free number above and the newsletter mailings. WE will start putting newsletters on an archive on the webpage and save the expense of the toll free phone number and mailing the newsletters. Our twentieth anniversary is October the 5th. When we started only twenty five percent of the people had internet access. That has reversed during the twenty years to where only twenty five percent do not have internet connections now. It should allow us more time to improve the website.
Our plans are to start work on redoing the website and updating the links. Please be patient as it will be a slow process.
These postings will continue from time to time so please check occasionally
Prostatitis Foundation
info@prostatitis.org

Educational brochure & booklet (August 30, )

We have copies of an educational brochure titled: Prostate Ultrasound and Biopsy and a 15 page booklet titled: Treating Prostate Problems. We purchased them from Krames, a company who call themselves the experts in patient education. You may obtain a free copy by sending your address to The Prostatitis Foundation, 1063 30th Street, Smithshire, Illinois 61478
Email us at info@prostatitis.org

NEW Fundinng Announcements 2015 (August 15, )


The National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is pleased to announce the release of new funding announcements for the NIDDK GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP). The application due date is November 9, 2015. Please be advised that, although not required, a letter of intent is strongly encouraged to be received by KUH by October 9, 2015. The following RFAs are available at:

· RFA-DK-15-014, Atlas Projects (U01): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-15-014.html

· RFA-DK-15-015, Database/Website Project (U24): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-15-015.html

· RFA-DK-15-016, Human Tissue Core (U24): http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DK-15-016.html


The NIDDK encourages individuals and organizations to promote and disseminate this RFA information in related newsletters, publications, or on organizational websites. To request additional information, please contact Dr. Deborah Hoshizaki at HoshizakiD@niddk.nih.gov.

PSA Controversy (April 3, )

We get a lot of inquiries about PSA testing and the need for subsequent biopsies. Most are from patients who have had an increase in readings which they think were caused by prostatitis.
Frequently they have had one negative biopsy and do not want to have the procedure again.

A urologist at an US TOO group meeting recently told the crowd that when he sent patients for a biopsy because of suspected cancer if they did not find cancer they did find inflammation/infection (prostatitis) in a very high percentage of patients. Like 85% or more.

There have been two interesting articles about the value of PSA testing recently. The last one in The Wall Street Journal (Personal Journal D1) on March 23rd of 2004 makes this statement; And at a PSA above 10- when doctors are far more likely to agree a biopsy is in order- a man doesn’t necessarily have cancer. Often simple infections and benign prostate problems can cause big spikes in PSA.

There is not total agreement among the medical profession about the use of these tests. In a sidebar on page 27 with an article in The Riverfront Times, St. Louis (November19-25, 2003) Bruce Rushton discusses the controversy. You may be able to find it at www.riverfronttimes.com) Go to the archives and type in authors name plus the keywords; Up Yours. If you can’t get to it we have permission to reissue copies courtesy of The Riverfront Times and Mr. Rushton.
Send an email to info@prostatitis.org
Prostatitis Foundation

Medical Tests for Prostate Problems (March 15, )

We get frequent questions about medical tests from new prostatitis patients. The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse has an excellent patient education fact sheet that explains most of the procedures. Those of you who wish can see it at www.niddk.nih.gov under “Health Information.”
Prostatitis Foundation

.........................................................................................
We're sorry you are having to learn about prostatitis, but we're glad you came here, because we think we can help. Please be advised that the Prostatitis Foundation does
not warrant, support, sponsor, endorse, recommend or accept responsibility for any health care provider or any treatment or protocol performed by any heath care provider.

© The Prostatitis Foundation
.........................................................................................

 
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